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Donald Trump considers mobilising 100,000 National Guard troops to round up undocumented immigrants Donald Trump considers mobilising 100,000 National Guard troops to round up undocumented immigrants
(35 minutes later)
Donald Trump's administration is considering mobilising as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up unauthorised immigrants, it has been reported.Donald Trump's administration is considering mobilising as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up unauthorised immigrants, it has been reported.
The Associated Press obtained a draft memo that calls for the unprecedented militarisation of the US immigration enforcement. But if implemented, governors in 11 states included in the draft memo would have final say on how many troops are actually deployed.The Associated Press obtained a draft memo that calls for the unprecedented militarisation of the US immigration enforcement. But if implemented, governors in 11 states included in the draft memo would have final say on how many troops are actually deployed.
The draft memo, written by Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, includes four states that border Mexico – Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California – but extends to seven contiguous states  – Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and Oregon. The draft memo, written by Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, includes four states that border Mexico – Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California – but extends to seven contiguous states  – Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and Oregon. 
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer denied the story in a tweet.  White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer denied the report as "100 per cent false" on Twitter, but could not say that the subject was never a topic of discussion within the administration.
"This is not true. DHS also confirms it is 100 per cent false," he said.  "I don't know what could potentially be out there, but I know that there is no effort to do what is potentially suggested," he said. "It is not a White House document."
The acting press secretary for the DHS also denied the report, saying: "The Department is not considering mobilising the National Guard."
But it remains unclear whether the White House will carry out this order as reported, as the administration has become notorious for attempting to discredit news stories that cast a unfavourable light on the President, writing them off as "fake".  But it remains unclear whether the White House will carry out this order as reported, as the administration has become notorious for attempting to discredit news stories that cast a unfavourable light on the President, writing them off as "fake".  
"You get five different answers on controversial issues depending on who you ask at [the White House]. It's hard to tell who's in charge and in the know," said Texas Rep Joaquin Castro, who criticised the draft memo as "mass deportation". "You get five different answers on controversial issues depending on who you ask at [the White House]. It's hard to tell who's in charge and in the know," said Texas Rep Joaquin Castro, who criticised the draft memo as "mass deportation". 
Earlier, Mr Castro said that it was "hard not to conclude that President Trump has started his mass deportation plan" after attending a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.Earlier, Mr Castro said that it was "hard not to conclude that President Trump has started his mass deportation plan" after attending a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
  
Mr Trump launched his campaign with particular focus on immigrants from Mexico, criminalising them with broad brushstrokes. In his now infamous June 2015 campaign announcement, he referred to Mexican immigrants as rapists and drug traffickers, solidified with his vow to build a wall along the already-militarised southern border. Mr Trump launched his campaign with particular focus on immigrants from Mexico, criminalising them with broad brushstrokes. In his now infamous June 2015 campaign announcement, he referred to Mexican immigrants as rapists and drug traffickers, solidified with his vow to build a wall along the already-militarised southern border. 
The administration hit the ground running with executive orders to carry out many of his campaign promises, which included the early stages of the wall-building project and the travel ban targeting seven majority-Muslim countries.The administration hit the ground running with executive orders to carry out many of his campaign promises, which included the early stages of the wall-building project and the travel ban targeting seven majority-Muslim countries.
The latter was blocked by a federal court shortly after its signing. The latter was blocked by a federal court shortly after its signing. 
More follows... In the first month of Mr Trump's administration, immigration enforcement officers carried out the first large-scale enforcement of Mr Trump's executive order to take action against undocumented people in the US.
Raids took place last week in and around New York, Los Angeles, North Carolina, South Carolina, Atlanta and Chicago, immigration officials confirmed – with more than a third of those detained in the Los Angeles area being deported to Mexico. 
But Mr Trump's enforcement efforts are made possible by infrastructure that has already been fortified by previous administrations. The Obama administration was fiercely criticised by immigrant rights groups for its part in ramping up immigration enforcement in the country.
Under Obama, ICE carried out some 2.5 million deportations between 2009 and 2015. 
"There’s a certain continuity between what has been proposed [by Trump] and what has been going on [under Obama],” Anthony Enriquez, the Equal Justice Works Emerson fellow at the Immigrant Defence Project, told The Independent late last year. "The issue of enforcement really begins with the Department of Homeland Security, that has just grown to really gigantic proportions.
"The infrastructure to carry out his announced plans already exists. The idea of mass deportation has already been normalised."
Despite Mr Obama’s legacy as "Deporter-in-Chief" amongst immigrant rights advocates, the number of deportations have dropped in the last two years – although the number still falls at 530,000. That trend that could likely reverse during Mr Trump’s time in the White House.