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CSIRO promises review after profiting from diet pill that was not 'clinically validated' CSIRO promises review after profiting from diet pill that was not 'clinically validated'
(about 2 hours later)
Federal science agency the CSIRO is reviewing its links to a diet pill after it emerged it was profiting from the sales of a product that is not medically proven. Australia’s national science agency, the CSIRO, is reviewing its links to a diet pill after it emerged it was profiting from the sales of a product that is not medically proven.
Blackmores is selling the Metabolic C12 supplement, under the umbrella of Impromy – a weight loss program the CSIRO developed.Blackmores is selling the Metabolic C12 supplement, under the umbrella of Impromy – a weight loss program the CSIRO developed.
CSIRO helped develop Impromy and clinically validated a related program called Flexi with Probiotec Limited.CSIRO helped develop Impromy and clinically validated a related program called Flexi with Probiotec Limited.
Probiotec later released the Metabolic C12 supplement, another product under the Impromy brand that was not clinically validated by the CSIRO.Probiotec later released the Metabolic C12 supplement, another product under the Impromy brand that was not clinically validated by the CSIRO.
Blackmores bought the Impromy brand from Probiotec in November last year.Blackmores bought the Impromy brand from Probiotec in November last year.
The CSIRO said it receives 1% of all Impromy sales revenue, which includes Metabolic C12, and a further 4% for future joint research.The CSIRO said it receives 1% of all Impromy sales revenue, which includes Metabolic C12, and a further 4% for future joint research.
The CSIRO has not “clinically validated” Metabolic C12, a spokesman said.The CSIRO has not “clinically validated” Metabolic C12, a spokesman said.
“The way in which CSIRO’s name is currently being used in association with the Impromy program sits outside the scope of what was approved by CSIRO in the original agreement with Probiotec,” the spokesman said. “Now that Blackmores has acquired Impromy, we are currently reviewing this legacy contract.”“The way in which CSIRO’s name is currently being used in association with the Impromy program sits outside the scope of what was approved by CSIRO in the original agreement with Probiotec,” the spokesman said. “Now that Blackmores has acquired Impromy, we are currently reviewing this legacy contract.”
He said as well as addressing the use of CSIRO’s name, it would also be looking to align future royalties received to the Impromy products that the agency has developed or clinically validated.He said as well as addressing the use of CSIRO’s name, it would also be looking to align future royalties received to the Impromy products that the agency has developed or clinically validated.
“All revenue we receive from commercial partnerships is reinvested back into science,” the spokesman said.“All revenue we receive from commercial partnerships is reinvested back into science,” the spokesman said.
Past marketing on the Impromy weight loss program’s Facebook page and current packaging references clinical testing by the University of Adelaide.Past marketing on the Impromy weight loss program’s Facebook page and current packaging references clinical testing by the University of Adelaide.
A university spokesman said the product was not developed or tested by its researchers.A university spokesman said the product was not developed or tested by its researchers.
A spokesman told the Age that nonetheless Metabolic C12 had permission to carry the institution’s name.A spokesman told the Age that nonetheless Metabolic C12 had permission to carry the institution’s name.
“University researchers ... conducted a series of studies all published in international scientific journals into the effects of lauric acid on hunger and energy intake but not weight loss,” a university spokesman told the paper.“University researchers ... conducted a series of studies all published in international scientific journals into the effects of lauric acid on hunger and energy intake but not weight loss,” a university spokesman told the paper.
“Our researchers say that at no point have they implied that the findings of this research indicate a benefit for weight loss. No studies have currently been conducted to investigate weight loss.”“Our researchers say that at no point have they implied that the findings of this research indicate a benefit for weight loss. No studies have currently been conducted to investigate weight loss.”
A Blackmores spokeswoman told the Age claims made about Metabolic C12 fall “below Blackmores’ strict standards” and the product was being reviewed. Blackmores said the company adheres to some of the most rigorous safety and quality standards in the world.
“Due to the reference to CSIRO on the packaging, we have taken immediate steps to withdraw the Metabolic C12 product from sale,” a spokeswoman said.
“Consumers can be assured that there are no product safety concerns.”
Chemists sell 30 capsule packs of Metabolic C12 for $19.99 and marketing says the product “helps to stimulate metabolic function and may assist weight loss by controlling hunger”.Chemists sell 30 capsule packs of Metabolic C12 for $19.99 and marketing says the product “helps to stimulate metabolic function and may assist weight loss by controlling hunger”.
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