This article is from the source 'guardian' and was first published or seen on . The next check for changes will be

You can find the current article at its original source at https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2017/sep/14/media-reforms-xenophon-google-facebook-investigation-politics-live

The article has changed 19 times. There is an RSS feed of changes available.

Version 6 Version 7
Labor labels Xenophon 'the great pretender' after he supports media reforms – politics live Labor labels Xenophon 'the great pretender' after he supports media reforms – politics live
(35 minutes later)
3.34am BST
03:34
A slightly unexpected move by the government in the Bill Shorten should be condemned motion.
Govt just gagged its own motion condemning Labor! Come on @JoshFrydenberg tell us some more how power prices going down!
Updated
at 3.46am BST
3.21am BST
03:21
Media reforms are back up for debate
The Senate has cleared its morning schedule a little bit faster than expected and has returned to the media reform debate.
3.19am BST
03:19
John Howard is keeping up the pressure on the Coalition in regards to religious freedoms in the marriage equality debate.
He has already, as Paul Karp points out, said this before. More than once.
Repeating the demand in a statement, Howard said the case for protections is “compelling”.
This issue must be addressed before the survey is completed; leaving it as something to be taken up only in the event of a Yes vote prevailing is the equivalent of saying that it does not matter. If a Yes vote is recorded there will be overwhelming pressure to “move on”, legislate as quickly as possible and then put the issue behind parliament. There will be scant opportunity for serious consideration of protections in the areas I have cited. Very likely, those raising such matters will be met with a chorus of put-downs and accused of attempting to frustrate the verdict of the people.
Thus far, the government’s response has been to wash its hands of any responsibility, merely stating that it will facilitate a private member’s bill. On the evidence to date, it would seem that the only protections in that bill will not go much beyond stipulations that no minister, priest, rabbi or imam will be compelled to perform a same-sex marriage ceremony.
Those campaigning for a Yes vote call any reference to these issues “red herrings” or distractions. On the contrary, they are legitimate concerns. It is completely disingenuous to assert that a change of this magnitude to a fundamental social institution does not have consequences. It is precisely because parliament should reflect the will of the people that the people are entitled to know what, if anything, the government will do on protections before they vote. Otherwise, people will not be fully informed when they vote.
Updated
at 3.36am BST
3.15am BST
03:15
The energy market operator wants a “day ahead” mechanism
Katharine Murphy
As Amy has already mentioned, the energy official that the Sydney broadcaster Alan Jones likes to refer to as “that woman” – Audrey Zibelman – has fronted a parliamentary committee in Canberra.Zibelman’s agency, the Australian Energy Market Operator, has washed up in the centre of Canberra’s energy policy debate courtesy of a recent report that attempts to quantify Australia’s requirements for dispatchable power once the ageing coal plants (we’re looking at you, Liddell) start to leave the system.
It’s pretty obvious from her outing that Aemo would like the government to develop a new market mechanism that ensures there are sufficient quantities of dispatchable power available in the market at all times.
In her evidence this morning, Zibelman floated the creation of a day ahead market – where the market operator identifies the energy demand for the next day, hour by hour, then generators bid in to supply the market. She thinks that would create more certainty in the market. She wants, in essence, a market around reliability. A day ahead market would also allow the market operator to deploy tools like demand management if there wasn’t availability in the system.
She also, in the politest possible way, would like the government to get cracking on resolving the energy policy quagmire. In order to have her desired system up and running by 2018, Zibelman said she needed a decision out of government in the next eight or nine months. She notes (with admirable understatement) that the market is current “quite anxious”, given all the uncertainty.
Zibelman in her evidence described an energy market in the middle of a profound transition.
She says people in the electricity market used to think in decades but now whole revolutions happen within a period of 18 months. This dynamic environment makes it hard for companies to make investments in assets that take eight or ten years to build, like base load power plants. She says the future is building assets like gas peaking plants, where capacity can switch on and off as required.
She also notes that investors need policy certainty. This, she says, is a “given”. Investors need the certainty of a clean energy target, she says, but the market operator needs something beyond this: it needs to be sure that power generators and retailers can meet daily and future demand. She said that, at the moment, the market is providing incentives for renewables, and that’s fine, but right now the market also needs to signal for reliability and dispatchability.
She said a portfolio solution was required – policies to reduce emissions, policies to ensure that there is enough dispatchable capacity in the market at any given time.
Zibelman says a bit of “mindfulness” is required.
Never a truer word.
Updated
at 3.39am BST
3.10am BST3.10am BST
03:1003:10
Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg is moving a motion condemning Opposition Leader Bill Shorten for a claim Labor has made all week - that Sydney power bill prices have increased by $1000. The energy minister, Josh Frydenberg, is moving a motion condemning the opposition leader, Bill Shorten, for a claim Labor has made all week that Sydney power bill prices have increased by $1,000.
He is quite energised about it.He is quite energised about it.
Updated
at 3.39am BST
2.55am BST2.55am BST
02:5502:55
The Liberals/Nationals in support of the ‘yes’ vote in the marriage equality campaign have gathered in Parliament - but Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who is in support of changing the marriage legislation, couldn’t make it. The Liberals/Nationals in support of the ‘yes’ vote in the marriage equality campaign have gathered in parliament but the prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, who is in support of changing the marriage legislation, couldn’t make it.
Big Libs Nats Yes presser happening at Parliament - lots of ministers (no PM) pic.twitter.com/zWTDgn1mk5Big Libs Nats Yes presser happening at Parliament - lots of ministers (no PM) pic.twitter.com/zWTDgn1mk5
Updated
at 3.40am BST
2.50am BST2.50am BST
02:5002:50
Former Speaker Harry Jenkins has just discovered his portrait has been moved on.... Former Speaker Harry Jenkins has just discovered his portrait has been moved on ...
(Don’t worry it will be back)(Don’t worry it will be back)
Former speaker Harry Jenkins discovers his portrait has been moved for the unveiling of Anna Burke's @AmyRemeikis pic.twitter.com/gNNL3tmz6qFormer speaker Harry Jenkins discovers his portrait has been moved for the unveiling of Anna Burke's @AmyRemeikis pic.twitter.com/gNNL3tmz6q
Updated
at 3.40am BST
2.48am BST2.48am BST
02:4802:48
Labor has ramped up its attack on both Nick Xenophon and the government over the media reforms deal Labor has ramped up its attack on both Nick Xenophon and the government over the media reforms deal.
Michelle Rowland said the Senate “exposed Nick Xenophon as the great pretender he is” after the key crossbencher agreed to support the government’s changes in return for a $60 million investment fund and ACCC investigation into Google and Facebook. Michelle Rowland said the Senate “exposed Nick Xenophon as the great pretender he is” after the key crossbencher agreed to support the government’s changes in return for a $60m investment fund and ACCC investigation into Google and Facebook.
Public policy questions of media ownership, media diversity and the future of public interest journalism are fundamental to our democracy, yet the Turnbull Government has conducted this debate behind closed doors. Public policy questions of media ownership, media diversity and the future of public interest journalism are fundamental to our democracy, yet the Turnbull government has conducted this debate behind closed doors.
The Turnbull Government’s chaos and ineptitude is completely contrary to the public interest. The Turnbull government’s chaos and ineptitude is completely contrary to the public interest.
This Government has seriously miscalculated the impact of these dirty deals and how Australians will respond.” This government has seriously miscalculated the impact of these dirty deals and how Australians will respond.
Updated
at 3.15am BST
2.34am BST2.34am BST
02:3402:34
Unemployment figures are outUnemployment figures are out
The ABS has just released the August Labour Force figures and unemployment has stayed steady at 5.6%.The ABS has just released the August Labour Force figures and unemployment has stayed steady at 5.6%.
Here are the key points from the latest ABS results:Here are the key points from the latest ABS results:
TREND ESTIMATES (MONTHLY CHANGE)TREND ESTIMATES (MONTHLY CHANGE)
Employment increased 27,100 to 12,249,500.Employment increased 27,100 to 12,249,500.
Unemployment decreased 2,200 to 723,200.Unemployment decreased 2,200 to 723,200.
Unemployment rate remained steady at 5.6%.Unemployment rate remained steady at 5.6%.
Participation rate increased by 0.1 pts to 65.2%.Participation rate increased by 0.1 pts to 65.2%.
Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased 3.9 million hours (0.2%) to 1,708.6 million hours.Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased 3.9 million hours (0.2%) to 1,708.6 million hours.
SEASONALLY ADJUSTED ESTIMATES (MONTHLY CHANGE)SEASONALLY ADJUSTED ESTIMATES (MONTHLY CHANGE)
Employment increased 54,200 to 12,269,000. Full-time employment increased 40,100 to 8,392,300 and part-time employment increased 14,100 to 3,876,700.Employment increased 54,200 to 12,269,000. Full-time employment increased 40,100 to 8,392,300 and part-time employment increased 14,100 to 3,876,700.
Unemployment decreased 1,100 to 727,500. The number of unemployed persons looking for full-time work increased 6,400 to 501,600 and the number of unemployed persons only looking for part-time work decreased 7,500 to 225,900.Unemployment decreased 1,100 to 727,500. The number of unemployed persons looking for full-time work increased 6,400 to 501,600 and the number of unemployed persons only looking for part-time work decreased 7,500 to 225,900.
Unemployment rate remained steady at 5.6%Unemployment rate remained steady at 5.6%
Participation rate increased by 0.2 pts to 65.3%.Participation rate increased by 0.2 pts to 65.3%.
Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased 6.1 million hours (0.4%) to 1,705.4 million hours.Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased 6.1 million hours (0.4%) to 1,705.4 million hours.
2.22am BST2.22am BST
02:2202:22
Amanda MeadeAmanda Meade
The Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance chief executive, Paul Murphy, says it is a poor day for media diversity because the media legislation will mean fewer owners and fewer journalists after the job losses that follow mergersThe Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance chief executive, Paul Murphy, says it is a poor day for media diversity because the media legislation will mean fewer owners and fewer journalists after the job losses that follow mergers
“Any initiative to support new investment in journalism is welcome but it should not come at the price of existing safeguards being removed,” Murphy said. “The last important protection – the two-out-of-three rule – has been abandoned and there is nothing in its place.“Any initiative to support new investment in journalism is welcome but it should not come at the price of existing safeguards being removed,” Murphy said. “The last important protection – the two-out-of-three rule – has been abandoned and there is nothing in its place.
“Australia, which already has one of the highest concentrations of media ownership in the world, is now saying that a plurality of media voices doesn’t matter. And history shows that, once diversity is lost, you cannot get it back.“Australia, which already has one of the highest concentrations of media ownership in the world, is now saying that a plurality of media voices doesn’t matter. And history shows that, once diversity is lost, you cannot get it back.
“The structural challenges faced by the Australian media sector will only be slightly stalled by these reforms. As companies amalgamate, more media jobs will be lost and with their loss, public scrutiny will be further reduced.“The structural challenges faced by the Australian media sector will only be slightly stalled by these reforms. As companies amalgamate, more media jobs will be lost and with their loss, public scrutiny will be further reduced.
“Meanwhile the government’s grubby deal with One Nation is beneath contempt. Facilitating baseless attacks on our public broadcasters is disgraceful and we will be lobbying senators to reject any legislation when it is presented.”“Meanwhile the government’s grubby deal with One Nation is beneath contempt. Facilitating baseless attacks on our public broadcasters is disgraceful and we will be lobbying senators to reject any legislation when it is presented.”
UpdatedUpdated
at 3.03am BSTat 3.03am BST
2.20am BST2.20am BST
02:2002:20
Energy market chief talks LiddellEnergy market chief talks Liddell
Audrey Zibelman, the chief of the Australian Energy Market Operator, is fronting the house environment and energy committee, talking about how to modernise Australia’s electricity grid.Audrey Zibelman, the chief of the Australian Energy Market Operator, is fronting the house environment and energy committee, talking about how to modernise Australia’s electricity grid.
But, of course, the MPs are taking advantage of the opportunity to question Zibelman about the Liddell power station.But, of course, the MPs are taking advantage of the opportunity to question Zibelman about the Liddell power station.
The government says it is acting on Liddell, by asking AGL to keep it open beyond 2022, or sell it to someone who will, because the regulator is worried about the amount of dispatch power that will be taken from the supply.The government says it is acting on Liddell, by asking AGL to keep it open beyond 2022, or sell it to someone who will, because the regulator is worried about the amount of dispatch power that will be taken from the supply.
Liddell was the earliest example of our concern that we might have a generator retire and we may not have new generation come in that is dispatchable. And one of the things we have identified is we have roughly 21,000 megawatts of pending requests for connection into the NEM and all of them are solar and wind.Liddell was the earliest example of our concern that we might have a generator retire and we may not have new generation come in that is dispatchable. And one of the things we have identified is we have roughly 21,000 megawatts of pending requests for connection into the NEM and all of them are solar and wind.
What we are saying, just like other markets, because we are not signalling precisely that we need resources that are controllable – we may need to do a market change, in order to make sure that reliability is priced well in the market.What we are saying, just like other markets, because we are not signalling precisely that we need resources that are controllable – we may need to do a market change, in order to make sure that reliability is priced well in the market.
Aemo’s initial analysis indicated the NEM will need as much as 1000 megawatts to of additional new flexible and dispatchable new resources to replace what Liddell supplies.Aemo’s initial analysis indicated the NEM will need as much as 1000 megawatts to of additional new flexible and dispatchable new resources to replace what Liddell supplies.
UpdatedUpdated
at 3.01am BSTat 3.01am BST
1.48am BST1.48am BST
01:4801:48
Pauline Hanson has spoken on her private members’ bill to ban the burqa and asks “are we that pathetic as a nation that we are giving up our values and who we truly are because we are worried about hurting someone’s feelings?”Pauline Hanson has spoken on her private members’ bill to ban the burqa and asks “are we that pathetic as a nation that we are giving up our values and who we truly are because we are worried about hurting someone’s feelings?”
Hanson says she has the support of the broader Australian community, including those who have practised the Islamic faith, such as a taxi driver who has since left the faith but said Hanson was “absolutely right”.Hanson says she has the support of the broader Australian community, including those who have practised the Islamic faith, such as a taxi driver who has since left the faith but said Hanson was “absolutely right”.
Legislation already exists to ensure people must show facial identification in areas where it is deemed a security risk but Hanson wants to take it further and ban facial coverings all together.Legislation already exists to ensure people must show facial identification in areas where it is deemed a security risk but Hanson wants to take it further and ban facial coverings all together.
I have seen a lot of people getting their feelings hurt in this country, and yet we stand up more for them. And I am getting fed up that we stand up for these people, these Muslims who stand up and protest. And we have got the Greens and others who are standing up and say: ‘Good on you, you’ve got your rights,’ but we forget about the rights of Australians, ordinary citizens, because we are howled down. If you were opposed to the whole situation, if you speak up and have an opinion, you are shut down because the left-leaning want to shut you down completely.I have seen a lot of people getting their feelings hurt in this country, and yet we stand up more for them. And I am getting fed up that we stand up for these people, these Muslims who stand up and protest. And we have got the Greens and others who are standing up and say: ‘Good on you, you’ve got your rights,’ but we forget about the rights of Australians, ordinary citizens, because we are howled down. If you were opposed to the whole situation, if you speak up and have an opinion, you are shut down because the left-leaning want to shut you down completely.
Hanson created an uproar when she wore a burqa into the Senate chamber, which prompted the attorney general, George Brandis, to deliver an emotional speech chastising her for the action. Labor and the Greens gave Brandis a standing ovation in response to the speech but Hanson has remained unrepentant.Hanson created an uproar when she wore a burqa into the Senate chamber, which prompted the attorney general, George Brandis, to deliver an emotional speech chastising her for the action. Labor and the Greens gave Brandis a standing ovation in response to the speech but Hanson has remained unrepentant.
UpdatedUpdated
at 2.19am BSTat 2.19am BST
1.19am BST1.19am BST
01:1901:19
There are thousands of papers to go through in regards to the Lionel Murphy investigation. If you have an interest in the raw documents, you will find them here.There are thousands of papers to go through in regards to the Lionel Murphy investigation. If you have an interest in the raw documents, you will find them here.
UpdatedUpdated
at 1.27am BSTat 1.27am BST
1.14am BST1.14am BST
01:1401:14
Anne DaviesAnne Davies
The “Class A papers” released today after 31 years reveal 14 allegations were put to Justice Lionel Murphy for his response back in 1986 by the parliamentary commission of inquiry. However, the inquiry was suspended due to Murphy’s ill health.The “Class A papers” released today after 31 years reveal 14 allegations were put to Justice Lionel Murphy for his response back in 1986 by the parliamentary commission of inquiry. However, the inquiry was suspended due to Murphy’s ill health.
Among them were allegations that in 1975, while a judge, Murphy had agreed with his friend, solicitor Morgan Ryan, that they should ask Abe Saffron to approach Danny Sankey, who was taking a private prosecution against him. The judge was asked to address the specific allegation that he knew this would result in Sankey being intimidated.Among them were allegations that in 1975, while a judge, Murphy had agreed with his friend, solicitor Morgan Ryan, that they should ask Abe Saffron to approach Danny Sankey, who was taking a private prosecution against him. The judge was asked to address the specific allegation that he knew this would result in Sankey being intimidated.
He was also asked to address whether he had sought to find out whether particular federal police were bribable or subject to influence and, in the case of Senior Detective Don Thomas, had sought to influence an investigation, offered to secure him a senior position in the federal police and sought to groom him as an information source.He was also asked to address whether he had sought to find out whether particular federal police were bribable or subject to influence and, in the case of Senior Detective Don Thomas, had sought to influence an investigation, offered to secure him a senior position in the federal police and sought to groom him as an information source.
There were also several allegations relating to Murphy’s interactions with chief magistrate Clarrie Breise that led to Murphy being tried and convicted but acquitted on appeal. These included that he had deliberately given sworn false evidence.There were also several allegations relating to Murphy’s interactions with chief magistrate Clarrie Breise that led to Murphy being tried and convicted but acquitted on appeal. These included that he had deliberately given sworn false evidence.
The documents reveal in total 33 allegations that were investigated by the commission of three judges.The documents reveal in total 33 allegations that were investigated by the commission of three judges.
The documents have emerged after the presiding officers of the federal parliament decided to release the papers assembled 31 years ago in 1986, as part of a commission of inquiry by three retired judges. The inquiry was formed to inquiry into whether Murphy had committed misconduct while a high court judge, in breach of the constitution.The documents have emerged after the presiding officers of the federal parliament decided to release the papers assembled 31 years ago in 1986, as part of a commission of inquiry by three retired judges. The inquiry was formed to inquiry into whether Murphy had committed misconduct while a high court judge, in breach of the constitution.
The inquiry was halted by the Hawke government after it was revealed that Murphy had inoperable cancer. He controversially returned to the high court to hear cases and later died.The inquiry was halted by the Hawke government after it was revealed that Murphy had inoperable cancer. He controversially returned to the high court to hear cases and later died.
The inquiry followed a turbulent few years in which Murphy was tried on two counts of attempting to pervert the course of justice in order to influence the trial of his friend the Sydney solicitor Morgan Ryan. Murphy was accused of approaching NSW district court judge Paul Flannery and the NSW chief magistrate Clarrie Briese to try and influence the trial.The inquiry followed a turbulent few years in which Murphy was tried on two counts of attempting to pervert the course of justice in order to influence the trial of his friend the Sydney solicitor Morgan Ryan. Murphy was accused of approaching NSW district court judge Paul Flannery and the NSW chief magistrate Clarrie Briese to try and influence the trial.
Murphy was initially found guilty over one of the incidents and cleared of the other but on appeal was acquitted of both.Murphy was initially found guilty over one of the incidents and cleared of the other but on appeal was acquitted of both.
However, the stain of the allegations remained and further allegations about the judge emerged as result of reporting by the Age, of illegal police phone taps known as the Age Tapes in 1984 and the subsequent Stewart royal commission.However, the stain of the allegations remained and further allegations about the judge emerged as result of reporting by the Age, of illegal police phone taps known as the Age Tapes in 1984 and the subsequent Stewart royal commission.
While the commission of inquiry was limited by its terms of reference in revisiting the incidents that had led to the criminal charges, it was believed back in 1986 to have been investigating numerous other incidents involving Murphy.While the commission of inquiry was limited by its terms of reference in revisiting the incidents that had led to the criminal charges, it was believed back in 1986 to have been investigating numerous other incidents involving Murphy.
Murphy was the former attorney general in the Whitlam government, before he was appointed to the high court by Labor in 1975. Regarded as a leading light of the Left, the judicial scandal which tarnished his later career deeply divided his supporters and critics. His untimely death at 64 left many unanswered questions.Murphy was the former attorney general in the Whitlam government, before he was appointed to the high court by Labor in 1975. Regarded as a leading light of the Left, the judicial scandal which tarnished his later career deeply divided his supporters and critics. His untimely death at 64 left many unanswered questions.
UpdatedUpdated
at 1.29am BSTat 1.29am BST
1.05am BST1.05am BST
01:0501:05
Paul Karp reports opponents of marriage equality have so far outspent the yes campaign by about five-to-one on television ads.Paul Karp reports opponents of marriage equality have so far outspent the yes campaign by about five-to-one on television ads.
Advertising analyst firm Ebiquity found the no campaign’s $312,000 and yes campaign’s $64,000 of TV ad spending is dwarfed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, which has spent $1.7m on the campaign so far.Advertising analyst firm Ebiquity found the no campaign’s $312,000 and yes campaign’s $64,000 of TV ad spending is dwarfed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, which has spent $1.7m on the campaign so far.
Both the Coalition for Marriage and Equality campaigns claim their opponent has more cash but the new figures draw into question the claim that the no side faces a “David and Goliath battle”, as the Australian Christian Lobby director, Lyle Shelton, put it at the National Press Club on Wednesday.Both the Coalition for Marriage and Equality campaigns claim their opponent has more cash but the new figures draw into question the claim that the no side faces a “David and Goliath battle”, as the Australian Christian Lobby director, Lyle Shelton, put it at the National Press Club on Wednesday.
You will find more on that story, hereYou will find more on that story, here
UpdatedUpdated
at 1.14am BSTat 1.14am BST