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Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Republican Lisa Murkowski will not support filling vacancy before election – live Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Republican Lisa Murkowski will not support filling vacancy before election – live
(32 minutes later)
Trump promises to nominate woman within a week but mourners at vigil and Democratic leaders vow to hit backTrump promises to nominate woman within a week but mourners at vigil and Democratic leaders vow to hit back
Reuters reports on a huge boost for Democratic causes, as donors flock to put their money where their mouths are over the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the looming fight to fill her supreme court seat:
Here’s the Associated Press on one of those key races, in which Democrat Mark Kelly is doing well in Arizona. And below is Lauren Gambino’s report on what Democrats and activists might do with all that money:
The New Jersey senator and former candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination Cory Booker thinks appeals to Republicans’ sense of morality might yet stop them pushing through a replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the election on 3 November, or even after it in the lame duck session.The New Jersey senator and former candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination Cory Booker thinks appeals to Republicans’ sense of morality might yet stop them pushing through a replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the election on 3 November, or even after it in the lame duck session.
“We’ve seen moments like this before, where healthcare was in the balance,” Booker told CBS’s Face the Nation. “And the American public, speaking out, got people like John McCain and a couple of my other colleagues to change their vote and do the right thing. So we’ll see how this plays out.”“We’ve seen moments like this before, where healthcare was in the balance,” Booker told CBS’s Face the Nation. “And the American public, speaking out, got people like John McCain and a couple of my other colleagues to change their vote and do the right thing. So we’ll see how this plays out.”
That was a reference to McCain’s dramatic return to the chamber and thumb-down gesture which killed an attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, in July 2017.That was a reference to McCain’s dramatic return to the chamber and thumb-down gesture which killed an attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, in July 2017.
But McCain died in August 2018 and Obamacare is just one progressive priority at risk should the court switch to a 6-3 conservative majority. Asked what tactics Democrats might use if appeals to the better angels of Republican natures somehow did not come off, and whether an impending government funding deadline might be leveraged, working on fears of a shutdown, Booker … dodged the question.But McCain died in August 2018 and Obamacare is just one progressive priority at risk should the court switch to a 6-3 conservative majority. Asked what tactics Democrats might use if appeals to the better angels of Republican natures somehow did not come off, and whether an impending government funding deadline might be leveraged, working on fears of a shutdown, Booker … dodged the question.
“For them to go against their word is pretty significant in the public space in terms of their own honor and legitimacy,” he said. “So we’ll see how that plays out. And in addition to that, the election has already begun. If there’s any more convincing that the public needs about what’s at stake, we see some of the most fundamental ideals of our nation that have been settled in many ways – the right for a woman to control her body, the basic understanding of civil rights law – all of that now is in the balance. And I think that this should motivate people significantly to speak up, let their voices be heard and be involved in this process.”“For them to go against their word is pretty significant in the public space in terms of their own honor and legitimacy,” he said. “So we’ll see how that plays out. And in addition to that, the election has already begun. If there’s any more convincing that the public needs about what’s at stake, we see some of the most fundamental ideals of our nation that have been settled in many ways – the right for a woman to control her body, the basic understanding of civil rights law – all of that now is in the balance. And I think that this should motivate people significantly to speak up, let their voices be heard and be involved in this process.”
Booker also skipped a question about whether he supported packing the court should the Democrats take the Senate, meaning increasing the number of justices beyond nine, a step which is theoretically possible and which many progressives support.Booker also skipped a question about whether he supported packing the court should the Democrats take the Senate, meaning increasing the number of justices beyond nine, a step which is theoretically possible and which many progressives support.
He wished, he said, “we would step back and take a beat and understand what we’re doing and the consequences and how they could radiate throughout time”.He wished, he said, “we would step back and take a beat and understand what we’re doing and the consequences and how they could radiate throughout time”.
Alaska Republican senator Lisa Murkowski says she will not support appointing a nominee to fill the supreme court vacancy following Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death.Alaska Republican senator Lisa Murkowski says she will not support appointing a nominee to fill the supreme court vacancy following Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death.
“For weeks, I have stated that I would not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to the election. Sadly, what was then a hypothetical is now our reality, but my position has not changed. I did not support taking up a nomination eight months before the 2016 election to fill the vacancy created by the passing of Justice Scalia. We are now even closer to the 2020 election – less than two months out – and I believe the same standard must apply,” Murkowski said in a statement.“For weeks, I have stated that I would not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to the election. Sadly, what was then a hypothetical is now our reality, but my position has not changed. I did not support taking up a nomination eight months before the 2016 election to fill the vacancy created by the passing of Justice Scalia. We are now even closer to the 2020 election – less than two months out – and I believe the same standard must apply,” Murkowski said in a statement.
The news is a blow for the Republicans’ drive to fill the vacancy before November’s election. However, even without Murkowski’s support they would still have the numbers in the Republican-held Senate to fill the vacancy, if the Alaska senator remains the only dissenting voice among them. Susan Collins is the other Republican senator to echo Murkowski’s views: two more would be needed to foil GOP plans.The news is a blow for the Republicans’ drive to fill the vacancy before November’s election. However, even without Murkowski’s support they would still have the numbers in the Republican-held Senate to fill the vacancy, if the Alaska senator remains the only dissenting voice among them. Susan Collins is the other Republican senator to echo Murkowski’s views: two more would be needed to foil GOP plans.
Two artists, Shawn Perkins and David Zambrano, have paid tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a mural depicting the supreme court justice near Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington DC.Two artists, Shawn Perkins and David Zambrano, have paid tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a mural depicting the supreme court justice near Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington DC.
“Over the past few months, we have been painting murals throughout DC, mainly on the wooden boards used to prevent vandalism on buildings and business near the a White House. The purpose is to uplift our community during these unpredictable times, through affirmations of hope and unity, along with honoring those who paved the way for those without a voice,” Perkins told CNN.“Over the past few months, we have been painting murals throughout DC, mainly on the wooden boards used to prevent vandalism on buildings and business near the a White House. The purpose is to uplift our community during these unpredictable times, through affirmations of hope and unity, along with honoring those who paved the way for those without a voice,” Perkins told CNN.
“Our latest installation was complete over the course of a day at Blackfinn DC, a well known restaurant pub blocks from the White House. With the recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there was no question who we would commemorate with this latest piece. It’s up indefinitely for now, the owner of the restaurant will likely keep it up throughout the rest of the year at least.”“Our latest installation was complete over the course of a day at Blackfinn DC, a well known restaurant pub blocks from the White House. With the recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there was no question who we would commemorate with this latest piece. It’s up indefinitely for now, the owner of the restaurant will likely keep it up throughout the rest of the year at least.”
People in public life tend to fall into one of two broad categories – those motivated by principle, and those motivated by power.People in public life tend to fall into one of two broad categories – those motivated by principle, and those motivated by power.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Friday night at the age of 87, exemplified the first.Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Friday night at the age of 87, exemplified the first.
When he nominated her in 1993, Bill Clinton called her “the Thurgood Marshall of gender-equality law”, comparing her advocacy and lower-court rulings in pursuit of equal rights for women to the work of the great jurist who advanced the cause of equal rights for Black people. Ginsburg persuaded the supreme court that the 14th amendment’s guarantee of equal protection applied not only to racial discrimination but to sex discrimination as well.When he nominated her in 1993, Bill Clinton called her “the Thurgood Marshall of gender-equality law”, comparing her advocacy and lower-court rulings in pursuit of equal rights for women to the work of the great jurist who advanced the cause of equal rights for Black people. Ginsburg persuaded the supreme court that the 14th amendment’s guarantee of equal protection applied not only to racial discrimination but to sex discrimination as well.
For Ginsburg, principle was everything – not only equal rights, but also the integrity of democracy. Always concerned about the consequences of her actions for the system as a whole, she advised young people “to fight for the things you care about but do it in a way that will lead others to join you”.For Ginsburg, principle was everything – not only equal rights, but also the integrity of democracy. Always concerned about the consequences of her actions for the system as a whole, she advised young people “to fight for the things you care about but do it in a way that will lead others to join you”.
Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, exemplifies the second category. He couldn’t care less about principle. He is motivated entirely by the pursuit of power.Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, exemplifies the second category. He couldn’t care less about principle. He is motivated entirely by the pursuit of power.
You can read Robert Reich’s full column below:You can read Robert Reich’s full column below:
Democrat senator Amy Klobuchar was on CNN’s State of the Union earlier, and was asked about how her party could stop Republican plans to fill the vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death before November’s election.Democrat senator Amy Klobuchar was on CNN’s State of the Union earlier, and was asked about how her party could stop Republican plans to fill the vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death before November’s election.
She said “a number of” Republicans have said they do not believe a vote on the supreme court nominee should be made before the next president is confirmed by voters. Klobuchar is presumably referring to Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who have both said they a nominee should not be confirmed before the election. However, if those two senators voted against a nominee, Republicans would still be able to usher in their choice for the supreme court as they hold a 53-47 majority in the Senate.She said “a number of” Republicans have said they do not believe a vote on the supreme court nominee should be made before the next president is confirmed by voters. Klobuchar is presumably referring to Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who have both said they a nominee should not be confirmed before the election. However, if those two senators voted against a nominee, Republicans would still be able to usher in their choice for the supreme court as they hold a 53-47 majority in the Senate.
“Right now, Ruth Bader Ginsburg just died recently. While Mitch McConnell has said what he has said, these [senators] aren’t beholden to him,” said Klobuchar.“Right now, Ruth Bader Ginsburg just died recently. While Mitch McConnell has said what he has said, these [senators] aren’t beholden to him,” said Klobuchar.
Ted Cruz delved deep into the history books, and threw in a plug for his own forthcoming book on the supreme court for good measure, as he attempted to justify Republican efforts to move quickly to vote on Donald Trump’s choice for Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s successor, reports Richard Luscombe.Ted Cruz delved deep into the history books, and threw in a plug for his own forthcoming book on the supreme court for good measure, as he attempted to justify Republican efforts to move quickly to vote on Donald Trump’s choice for Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s successor, reports Richard Luscombe.
“If you look at history, if you actually look at what the precedent is, this has happened 29 times,” the Texas senator said on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, referring to election-year vacancies on the supreme court.“If you look at history, if you actually look at what the precedent is, this has happened 29 times,” the Texas senator said on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, referring to election-year vacancies on the supreme court.
“There’s a big difference with whether the Senate is of the same party of the president or a different party. When the Senate has been of the same party of the president, of the 29 times, those are 19 of them.“There’s a big difference with whether the Senate is of the same party of the president or a different party. When the Senate has been of the same party of the president, of the 29 times, those are 19 of them.
“Of those 19, the Senate has confirmed those nominees 17 times. So if the parties are the same, the Senate confirms the nominee.“Of those 19, the Senate has confirmed those nominees 17 times. So if the parties are the same, the Senate confirms the nominee.
“When the parties are different, that’s happened 10 times. Merrick Garland was one of them. Of those 10, the Senate has confirmed the nominees only twice.”“When the parties are different, that’s happened 10 times. Merrick Garland was one of them. Of those 10, the Senate has confirmed the nominees only twice.”
Cruz’s “precedent” argument sits uneasy with Democratic critics, who point out that Republicans successfully stalled Garland, Barack Obama’s nominee after the death of Antonin Scalia in 2016, for 10 months, denying him even a hearing. Yet the same Republican Senate majority is promising a vote to confirm Ginsburg’s successor by the end of the year.Cruz’s “precedent” argument sits uneasy with Democratic critics, who point out that Republicans successfully stalled Garland, Barack Obama’s nominee after the death of Antonin Scalia in 2016, for 10 months, denying him even a hearing. Yet the same Republican Senate majority is promising a vote to confirm Ginsburg’s successor by the end of the year.
But Cruz - who made sure to reference, twice, next month’s publication of his book One Vote Away: How A Single Supreme Court Seat Can Change History - insisted there was nothing partisan about it.But Cruz - who made sure to reference, twice, next month’s publication of his book One Vote Away: How A Single Supreme Court Seat Can Change History - insisted there was nothing partisan about it.
“It’s not just simply your party, my party,” he said. “It’s a question of checks and balances. In order for a supreme court nomination to go forward, you have to have the president and the Senate. In this instance, the American people voted. They elected Donald Trump.”“It’s not just simply your party, my party,” he said. “It’s a question of checks and balances. In order for a supreme court nomination to go forward, you have to have the president and the Senate. In this instance, the American people voted. They elected Donald Trump.”
Cruz also made the case that a ninth judge needed to be seated in case the November election resulted in a contentious legal battle, similar to Bush v Gore in 2000 that ended with the supreme court installing the Republican.Cruz also made the case that a ninth judge needed to be seated in case the November election resulted in a contentious legal battle, similar to Bush v Gore in 2000 that ended with the supreme court installing the Republican.
“We need a full court on election day, given the very high likelihood that we’re going to see litigation that goes to the court,” said Cruz, who was part of the Republican legal team in 2000 and is one of Trump’s possible nominees.“We need a full court on election day, given the very high likelihood that we’re going to see litigation that goes to the court,” said Cruz, who was part of the Republican legal team in 2000 and is one of Trump’s possible nominees.
“We need a supreme court that can give a definitive answer for the country.”“We need a supreme court that can give a definitive answer for the country.”
Hillary Clinton is on NBC’s Meet the Press. She is asked about her time as a senator compared to now - and the Senate judicial confirmation process. Chuck Todd asks Clinton “how broken” she believes the confirmation process to be.Hillary Clinton is on NBC’s Meet the Press. She is asked about her time as a senator compared to now - and the Senate judicial confirmation process. Chuck Todd asks Clinton “how broken” she believes the confirmation process to be.
“It’s absolutely broken,” she says, “and it has been broken for a while.” She adds that Republicans “made a precedent” in 2016 when they blocked Barack Obama’s nominee to the supreme court in an election year “and they should now honour” that precedent by delaying a replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg until after this November’s election.“It’s absolutely broken,” she says, “and it has been broken for a while.” She adds that Republicans “made a precedent” in 2016 when they blocked Barack Obama’s nominee to the supreme court in an election year “and they should now honour” that precedent by delaying a replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg until after this November’s election.
She says the Republicans’ machinations over a replacement for Ginsburg are “a new blow” to US institutions. She adds US institutions such as the supreme court are being “undermined by a lust for power”. She believes the cost is that we risk “ensuring institutions withstand whatever the political winds may be”.She says the Republicans’ machinations over a replacement for Ginsburg are “a new blow” to US institutions. She adds US institutions such as the supreme court are being “undermined by a lust for power”. She believes the cost is that we risk “ensuring institutions withstand whatever the political winds may be”.
Clinton says we are at a “very dangerous point in US history.” There is a “concerted effort” by Republicans to turn the clock back on progress for minorities and women. She says that it is not just the supreme court where this is happening, but by the appointment of conservative judges at federal and district level who may not even believe in Roe v Wade.Clinton says we are at a “very dangerous point in US history.” There is a “concerted effort” by Republicans to turn the clock back on progress for minorities and women. She says that it is not just the supreme court where this is happening, but by the appointment of conservative judges at federal and district level who may not even believe in Roe v Wade.
Richard Luscombe has news of Democrats hoping to reach out across the aisle following Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death.Richard Luscombe has news of Democrats hoping to reach out across the aisle following Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death.
Delaware’s Democratic senator Chris Coons says he hopes to persuade several Republican “friends” in the upper chamber to resist the rushing through of Donald Trump’s supreme court nominee, claiming a swift confirmation would “dishonor Justice Ginsburg’s legacy.”Delaware’s Democratic senator Chris Coons says he hopes to persuade several Republican “friends” in the upper chamber to resist the rushing through of Donald Trump’s supreme court nominee, claiming a swift confirmation would “dishonor Justice Ginsburg’s legacy.”
“Her dying wish was that the voters should choose the next president, the next president should choose her successor, that’s because she understood deeply our constitution and the significance of the supreme court and its legitimacy,” he said on Fox News Sunday.“Her dying wish was that the voters should choose the next president, the next president should choose her successor, that’s because she understood deeply our constitution and the significance of the supreme court and its legitimacy,” he said on Fox News Sunday.
“I’m going to be working this week to reach across the aisle to see if I can’t persuade some friends to respect tradition, to respect the precedent they set in 2016 and let the voters decide.”“I’m going to be working this week to reach across the aisle to see if I can’t persuade some friends to respect tradition, to respect the precedent they set in 2016 and let the voters decide.”
Challenged by host Chris Wallace why Democrats demanded a vote on Barack Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland in that election year, yet now wanted to delay Trump’s choice, Coons insisted the situation was different.Challenged by host Chris Wallace why Democrats demanded a vote on Barack Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland in that election year, yet now wanted to delay Trump’s choice, Coons insisted the situation was different.
“In 25 states across our country Americans are already voting,” he said, pointing out that Garland’s nomination was nine months before election day.“In 25 states across our country Americans are already voting,” he said, pointing out that Garland’s nomination was nine months before election day.
“For the Republican majority, just 44 days before the next presidential election, to rush through a new justice in a partisan confirmation process will further divide our country. [They] set this new precedent, they fought hard for it, so if they were going to set a precedent that in an election year there shouldn’t be a hearing, meetings, votes, they should live by it. Fair is fair.”“For the Republican majority, just 44 days before the next presidential election, to rush through a new justice in a partisan confirmation process will further divide our country. [They] set this new precedent, they fought hard for it, so if they were going to set a precedent that in an election year there shouldn’t be a hearing, meetings, votes, they should live by it. Fair is fair.”
In 2016, Republicans blocked Barack Obama’s nominee to the supreme court in the run-up to the presidential election. This year, they are preparing to rush through Donald Trump’s nominee before the presidential election. How voters react to this seeming hypocrisy remains to be seen. In an appearance on CNN’s State of the Union, Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, is asked if these tactics could hurt Republican senators in close races in November.In 2016, Republicans blocked Barack Obama’s nominee to the supreme court in the run-up to the presidential election. This year, they are preparing to rush through Donald Trump’s nominee before the presidential election. How voters react to this seeming hypocrisy remains to be seen. In an appearance on CNN’s State of the Union, Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, is asked if these tactics could hurt Republican senators in close races in November.
“As far as the politics of it, I think the American people wanted Donald Trump to make nominations,” Short says.“As far as the politics of it, I think the American people wanted Donald Trump to make nominations,” Short says.
More from House speaker Nancy Pelosi on ABC’s This Week. Host George Stephanopoulos asks her about scenarios in which Democrats would seek to block a Republican nomination to fill the vacancy left on the supreme court by the death of Ruth Bader GinsburgMore from House speaker Nancy Pelosi on ABC’s This Week. Host George Stephanopoulos asks her about scenarios in which Democrats would seek to block a Republican nomination to fill the vacancy left on the supreme court by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
“Some have mentioned the possibility if [Republicans] try to push through a nominee in a lame duck session that you and the House can move to impeach President Trump or Attorney General Barr as a way of stalling and preventing the Senate from acting on this nomination,” says Stephanopoulos.“Some have mentioned the possibility if [Republicans] try to push through a nominee in a lame duck session that you and the House can move to impeach President Trump or Attorney General Barr as a way of stalling and preventing the Senate from acting on this nomination,” says Stephanopoulos.
Pelosi does not rule out that possibility. “Well, we have our options. We have arrows in our quiver that I’m not about to discuss right now, but the fact is we have a big challenge in our country. This president has threatened to not even accept the results of the election with statements that he and his henchmen have made,” she says.Pelosi does not rule out that possibility. “Well, we have our options. We have arrows in our quiver that I’m not about to discuss right now, but the fact is we have a big challenge in our country. This president has threatened to not even accept the results of the election with statements that he and his henchmen have made,” she says.
Stephanopoulos presses Pelosi again, asking if she “not ruling anything out”.Stephanopoulos presses Pelosi again, asking if she “not ruling anything out”.
“Yeah,” she says. “We have a responsibility. We’ve taken an oath to protect and defend the constitution of the United States. We have a responsibility to meet the needs of the American people.“Yeah,” she says. “We have a responsibility. We’ve taken an oath to protect and defend the constitution of the United States. We have a responsibility to meet the needs of the American people.
“That is when we weigh the equities of protecting our democracy requires us to use every arrow in our quiver.”“That is when we weigh the equities of protecting our democracy requires us to use every arrow in our quiver.”
Republican senator Tom Cotton, who is on Donald Trump’s shortlist to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the supreme court, offered an extraordinary observation of the reaction to her death on Fox News Sunday, reports Richard Luscombe.Republican senator Tom Cotton, who is on Donald Trump’s shortlist to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the supreme court, offered an extraordinary observation of the reaction to her death on Fox News Sunday, reports Richard Luscombe.
“The Democrats are saying radical things right now, Democrats are threatening to riot in the streets, Democrats are already rioting in the streets though,” Cotton told host Chris Wallace.“The Democrats are saying radical things right now, Democrats are threatening to riot in the streets, Democrats are already rioting in the streets though,” Cotton told host Chris Wallace.
“They’re threatening to pack the court, they were already threatening to pack the court,” he added, referring to suggestions any Democratic-led Senate might add seats to the supreme court next year.“They’re threatening to pack the court, they were already threatening to pack the court,” he added, referring to suggestions any Democratic-led Senate might add seats to the supreme court next year.
Cotton’s assessment contrasts sharply with scenes in Washington DC on Saturday night, when thousands attended a peaceful candlelight vigil to celebrate the life of the 87-year-old justice, who died on Friday.Cotton’s assessment contrasts sharply with scenes in Washington DC on Saturday night, when thousands attended a peaceful candlelight vigil to celebrate the life of the 87-year-old justice, who died on Friday.
The protests that swept the nation in the wake of the Memorial Day killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis were over race and police brutality, but Cotton appeared to want to link the reaction to that episode to the upcoming fight for the supreme court seat.The protests that swept the nation in the wake of the Memorial Day killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis were over race and police brutality, but Cotton appeared to want to link the reaction to that episode to the upcoming fight for the supreme court seat.
Cotton, a right-wing Arkansas senator, had acknowledged his interest in the vacancy. But that hope was effectively ended by Trump’s pronouncement that he would pick a woman.Cotton, a right-wing Arkansas senator, had acknowledged his interest in the vacancy. But that hope was effectively ended by Trump’s pronouncement that he would pick a woman.
Cotton dismissed allegations of hypocrisy directed at Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, who has promised a vote this year on Trump’s choice after successfully blocking the confirmation of then-president Barack Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland in 2016 because it was an election year.Cotton dismissed allegations of hypocrisy directed at Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, who has promised a vote this year on Trump’s choice after successfully blocking the confirmation of then-president Barack Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland in 2016 because it was an election year.
“In 2014, the American people elected a Republican majority to the Senate to put the brakes on President Obama’s judicial nominations,” Cotton said.“In 2014, the American people elected a Republican majority to the Senate to put the brakes on President Obama’s judicial nominations,” Cotton said.
“In 2018 we had a referendum just a month before the midterms, [the] vote on Justice Kavanaugh. Democratic senators can look at what happened, four of their colleagues lost their re-election a month after voting against Justice Kavanaugh.“In 2018 we had a referendum just a month before the midterms, [the] vote on Justice Kavanaugh. Democratic senators can look at what happened, four of their colleagues lost their re-election a month after voting against Justice Kavanaugh.
“We’re not going to rush, cut corners or skip steps. The Senate will exercise our constitutional duty. We’ll process that nomination, we’ll conduct hearings, we’ll be thorough and deliberate and careful just as we were with the nominations of Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh.”“We’re not going to rush, cut corners or skip steps. The Senate will exercise our constitutional duty. We’ll process that nomination, we’ll conduct hearings, we’ll be thorough and deliberate and careful just as we were with the nominations of Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh.”
House speaker Nancy Pelosi is on ABC’s This Week. She is asked about the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.House speaker Nancy Pelosi is on ABC’s This Week. She is asked about the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
“I’m so glad that the country is providing such an outpouring of love and support to honor [Ginsburg] – petite, tiny in size, huge in impact, and a powerful, brilliant brain on the court,” says Pelosi.“I’m so glad that the country is providing such an outpouring of love and support to honor [Ginsburg] – petite, tiny in size, huge in impact, and a powerful, brilliant brain on the court,” says Pelosi.
If Republicans manage to usher in a conservative replacement for Ginsburg on the supreme court before the election (or, indeed, after it if they do well in November) Obamacare could be in danger. Pelosi refers to that scenario.If Republicans manage to usher in a conservative replacement for Ginsburg on the supreme court before the election (or, indeed, after it if they do well in November) Obamacare could be in danger. Pelosi refers to that scenario.
“In terms of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, any one of us who knew her, who loved her, who respected her, and that includes almost anybody who had an appreciation for greatness, mourn her loss, but would want us to move forward to protect the people who are sick, those with coronavirus who now have ... millions of them now have a preexisting condition. That’s what the president wants to crush when he says he wants to replace [Ginsburg] in this short period of time,” says Pelosi.“In terms of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, any one of us who knew her, who loved her, who respected her, and that includes almost anybody who had an appreciation for greatness, mourn her loss, but would want us to move forward to protect the people who are sick, those with coronavirus who now have ... millions of them now have a preexisting condition. That’s what the president wants to crush when he says he wants to replace [Ginsburg] in this short period of time,” says Pelosi.
As speaker for the House, Pelosi is leading negotiations with Republicans over a new government funding bill during Covid-19. She is asked if she can “use leverage in those negotiations to slow the nomination [to replace Ginsburg] down?”As speaker for the House, Pelosi is leading negotiations with Republicans over a new government funding bill during Covid-19. She is asked if she can “use leverage in those negotiations to slow the nomination [to replace Ginsburg] down?”
“None of us has any interest in shutting down government. That has such a harmful and painful impact on so many people in our country,” she says. “So I would hope that we can just proceed with that. There is some enthusiasm among some exuberance on the left to say let’s use that, but we’re not going to be shutting down government.”“None of us has any interest in shutting down government. That has such a harmful and painful impact on so many people in our country,” she says. “So I would hope that we can just proceed with that. There is some enthusiasm among some exuberance on the left to say let’s use that, but we’re not going to be shutting down government.”