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Coronavirus live news: curfew starts for millions in France; restrictions eased in Melbourne Coronavirus live news: curfew starts for millions in France; restrictions eased in Melbourne
(32 minutes later)
Paris and several other French cities face month of restrictions; numbers soar in Europe amid new lockdowns; Melbourne lockdown eased from midnight with travel distance increased to 25km – follow liveParis and several other French cities face month of restrictions; numbers soar in Europe amid new lockdowns; Melbourne lockdown eased from midnight with travel distance increased to 25km – follow live
Malaysian health authorities have reported 871 new cases on Sunday; the nation’s worst daily count. It raises its total infections to 20,498. The Southeast Asian country, which imposed targeted lockdowns this month as infections surged, also recorded seven new deaths, bringing the total number of fatalities to 187.
The health ministry’s director general Noor Hisham Abdullah told reporters the infection rate had dropped since a third wave of infections in the country began four weeks ago.
Israel will require incoming travellers from the UK to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, information on an Israeli government website shows.Israel will require incoming travellers from the UK to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, information on an Israeli government website shows.
The infection rate in the UK has risen sharply in recent weeks, prompting the UK’s prime minister Boris Johnson to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.The infection rate in the UK has risen sharply in recent weeks, prompting the UK’s prime minister Boris Johnson to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.
The UK has been one of 31 “green” countries from which travellers who meet a series of special requirements could enter Israel without a mandatory quarantine period.The UK has been one of 31 “green” countries from which travellers who meet a series of special requirements could enter Israel without a mandatory quarantine period.
The UK’s status will change to “red” on 23 October, Israeli health ministry information shows.The UK’s status will change to “red” on 23 October, Israeli health ministry information shows.
The health ministry identifies some 185 other countries and localities as red, implying high infection rates. Incoming Israeli travellers are also subject to mandatory self-isolation.The health ministry identifies some 185 other countries and localities as red, implying high infection rates. Incoming Israeli travellers are also subject to mandatory self-isolation.
Israel has begun rolling back a second-wave lockdown that has helped reduce new cases. The country has closed its borders to most non-Israelis, with exceptions including foreign workers and Jewish yeshiva students.Israel has begun rolling back a second-wave lockdown that has helped reduce new cases. The country has closed its borders to most non-Israelis, with exceptions including foreign workers and Jewish yeshiva students.
The Philippines’ health ministry has reported 2,379 new confirmed cases and 50 additional fatalities, bringing the total in the country to 356,618 cases and 6,652 deaths. It also said 14,941 more individuals had recovered, bringing total recoveries to 310,158.The Philippines’ health ministry has reported 2,379 new confirmed cases and 50 additional fatalities, bringing the total in the country to 356,618 cases and 6,652 deaths. It also said 14,941 more individuals had recovered, bringing total recoveries to 310,158.
Gove has defended police in the UK being given data from the NHS’s test and trace system, saying that officers are operating in a “very proportionate way”.Gove has defended police in the UK being given data from the NHS’s test and trace system, saying that officers are operating in a “very proportionate way”.
Reacting to news, the director of the Open Rights Group, Jim Killock, said:Reacting to news, the director of the Open Rights Group, Jim Killock, said:
Doctors’ haste to mechanically ventilate patients at the start of the pandemic might have contributed to the higher rate of death in spring compared to now, a senior medic has said.Doctors’ haste to mechanically ventilate patients at the start of the pandemic might have contributed to the higher rate of death in spring compared to now, a senior medic has said.
Dr Alison Pittard, the dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine in London, said doctors’ evolving understanding of the virus had dramatically upped the survival rate.Dr Alison Pittard, the dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine in London, said doctors’ evolving understanding of the virus had dramatically upped the survival rate.
At the start of the pandemic, just 66% of people in hospital with the virus survived, compared to 84% in August. Dr Pittard told Sky News:At the start of the pandemic, just 66% of people in hospital with the virus survived, compared to 84% in August. Dr Pittard told Sky News:
She said intensive care teams now use a variety of interventions to help patients breathe, and full mechanical ventilation is a last resort.She said intensive care teams now use a variety of interventions to help patients breathe, and full mechanical ventilation is a last resort.
Pittard said there’s no evidence to suggest Covid-19 has become less dangerous despite falling death rates in the UK. She said that, although treatment is improving, social distancing is also having an impact on transmission and viral load.Pittard said there’s no evidence to suggest Covid-19 has become less dangerous despite falling death rates in the UK. She said that, although treatment is improving, social distancing is also having an impact on transmission and viral load.
Keeping critical care facilities open to non-Covid patients will be vital to minimising the collateral damage of the next wave of the pandemic, Pittard added.Keeping critical care facilities open to non-Covid patients will be vital to minimising the collateral damage of the next wave of the pandemic, Pittard added.
She said that minimising transmission within the community was the best way to prevent urgent care units becoming overburdened. Pittard said the focus of the next wave of the pandemic “isn’t going to be on Covid patients getting access to healthcare, it is going to be for those patients that don’t have Covid”.She said that minimising transmission within the community was the best way to prevent urgent care units becoming overburdened. Pittard said the focus of the next wave of the pandemic “isn’t going to be on Covid patients getting access to healthcare, it is going to be for those patients that don’t have Covid”.
The UK government’s cabinet office minister Michael Gove has defended the £7,000 day rates paid to some executives from Boston Consulting Group (BCG) who are helping the government set up and run its testing system.The UK government’s cabinet office minister Michael Gove has defended the £7,000 day rates paid to some executives from Boston Consulting Group (BCG) who are helping the government set up and run its testing system.
He insisted the spend was a good use of public money, adding:He insisted the spend was a good use of public money, adding:
Here’s a little more from Prof Jeremy Farrer, who has been laying bare the scale of the national crisis. The “worst-case scenario” of 50,000 cases per day across the UK is “almost exactly where we are at”, he has told Sky News.Here’s a little more from Prof Jeremy Farrer, who has been laying bare the scale of the national crisis. The “worst-case scenario” of 50,000 cases per day across the UK is “almost exactly where we are at”, he has told Sky News.
Burnham called for MPs in Westminster to intervene and ensure tier 3 restrictions come with an adequate financial package.Burnham called for MPs in Westminster to intervene and ensure tier 3 restrictions come with an adequate financial package.
He reiterated his call for the 80% furlough scheme to be reintroduced to support workers in firms that are forced to close.He reiterated his call for the 80% furlough scheme to be reintroduced to support workers in firms that are forced to close.
And Burnham criticised a letter from 20 Tory MPs who called on him to work with the government’s approach to regional lockdowns.And Burnham criticised a letter from 20 Tory MPs who called on him to work with the government’s approach to regional lockdowns.
The mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said he will be having a call with the UK prime minister’s chief strategic adviser Sir Edward Lister over lockdown restrictions on Sunday.The mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said he will be having a call with the UK prime minister’s chief strategic adviser Sir Edward Lister over lockdown restrictions on Sunday.
Asked if he was going to be speaking with Boris Johnson, Burnham told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show:Asked if he was going to be speaking with Boris Johnson, Burnham told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show:
Burnham, who is resisting the highest level of controls without more financial support for workers and businesses, accused Johnson of having exaggerated the severity of the situation in the region.Burnham, who is resisting the highest level of controls without more financial support for workers and businesses, accused Johnson of having exaggerated the severity of the situation in the region.
Here’s a little more detail on those comments from Prof Jeremy Farrer, the member of the UK government scientific advisory group who is still recommending a short national lockdown in England. He told Sky News:Here’s a little more detail on those comments from Prof Jeremy Farrer, the member of the UK government scientific advisory group who is still recommending a short national lockdown in England. He told Sky News:
Italy has approved a new stimulus package in its 2021 budget to foster an economic rebound from the recession caused by the pandemic, its government has said after a late-night cabinet meeting.
The ruling coalition, led by the anti-establishment 5-Star Movement and centre-left PD party, agreed a preliminary version of the stimulus package, a government source said, leaving final details to be hammered out.
Among measures to support the health and education system, the government will set up a €4bn (£3.54bn, $4.7bn) fund to compensate companies worst hit by lockdowns. The budget also extends temporary lay-off schemes for companies with workers on furlough and offers tax breaks to support employment in the poor south of the country.
The Italian prime minister Giuseppe Conte is expected to also announce new measures to curb the steady spike in cases over recent weeks.
Indonesia has reported 4,105 new infections, taking the total to 361,867, data from the country’s taskforce shows. The data added 80 new deaths, taking the total to 12,511.
Both the number of cases and deaths in the Southeast Asian country are the highest in the region.
Farrer predicted a “tough” Christmas, saying he does not believe families in the UK will be able to come together this year as they may ordinarily do. He said the next few months were going to be a difficult period but that the country needed to get through it until vaccines and treatments were available.
The director of the Wellcome Trust also said the data he has seen suggests compliance with restrictions has been better than some think, but that they restrictions themselves have been insufficient.
Asked about vaccines, Farrer said the UK was in an “extraordinarily strong position” and that the country has access to a range of types of vaccine; more than one of which is likely to be available for use next year.
Farrer told Sky News he does not believe the whole population will need to be vaccinated immediately.
The Sage member said treatments may come even sooner than vaccines, predicting that they could be as little as three months away.
The UK government’s scientific adviser Sir Jeremy Farrar has reiterated that the best way to reduce the transmission is to introduce a national-level circuit-break lockdown. And he said that, while the government should have acted in September, it could still do so effectively now, adding.
Speaking to Sky News immediately after Gove, the member of the government’s scientific advisory group said the worst thing to do would be to wait until November to act.
Farrer added that he believed vaccines could start to become available in the first quarter of 2021.
Speaking later, Gove did not answer when asked why the UK government would not release data on the levels of compliance with the existing rules, though he insisted it was not a case being worried compliance would fall further if people saw it was already low. He would say:
But he acknowledged that part of the reason some people have not complied with the rules has been that to comply would cause serious financial hardship and said the government had therefore provided support.
Statutory sick pay, which the UK government has put in place for that purpose and on which many are forced to rely when self-isolating, is about a quarter of the full-time minimum wage.
Labour’s shadow education secretary Kate Green has said such a lockdown would give the UK a chance to “reset” before the epidemic spirals out of control. She told the same broadcaster:
England will not be placed under a two or three-week “circuit-breaker” national lockdown to slow the spread of the virus and give the country time to get its test and trace system up to speed, the UK’s cabinet office minister Michael Gove has said.
He has told Sky News that there should not be “blanket restrictions” across the whole of the country even for a limited period, as the opposition Labour party have called for, when the virus is spreading less quickly in some areas than others. Gove added, however, that the government would act later if it felt it had become necessary.
The UK’s government has ignored the advice of its scientific advisers, who have said its current plan is not enough on its own to stop the second wave and that a short “circuit breaker” lockdown should be introduced.
Russia has recorded 15,099 new cases, pushing the national tally to 1,399,334, local officials have said. They also said 185 people died in the previous 24 hours, taking the official death toll to 24,187, and that 1,070,576 people had recovered from the virus.
They are struggling to navigate the new tier 2 restrictions in Navigator Square. The small, pedestrianised enclave at the top of the Holloway Road in Archway, north London, is a hive of activity on Saturdays. A market draws crowds who come for artisanal breads and French cheeses.
As a result, the Archway Tavern, famous for featuring on the front cover of the Kinks album Muswell Hillbillies, has enjoyed a promising start since it reopened post-lockdown.
After years of lying empty, it was beginning to attract a varied crowd who came for coffee in the morning, light lunches with friends and after-work drinks with colleagues at night.
On Friday night, before the restrictions kicked in, it was packed as people made the most of what could be the last hurrah of 2020. But by lunchtime yesterday, the wooden tables outside the pub were almost empty.
Confusion and fear generated by the new tier 2 rules appears to be a major factor in people staying away, according to Chriss Cinçon, a bartender at the tavern.