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Donald Trump becomes the first US president to be impeached for a second time – live Donald Trump becomes the first US president to be impeached for a second time – live
(32 minutes later)
Ten House Republicans join Democrats to impeach president on charge of incitement of insurrection after violent riot at US CapitolTen House Republicans join Democrats to impeach president on charge of incitement of insurrection after violent riot at US Capitol
After several Republican members of Congress protested the metal detectors installed after the deadly attack on the US Capitol, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduced a rule change to fine members who evade the detectors.
The House will vote on the fines when Congress returns to session on 21 January.
“On behalf of the House, I express my deepest gratitude to the U.S. Capitol Police for the valor that they showed during the deadly insurrection on the Capitol, as they protected the lives of the staff and the Congress,” Pelosi said. “Sadly, just days later, many House Republicans have disrespected our heroes by verbally abusing them and refusing to adhere to basic precautions keeping members of our Congressional community, including the Capitol Police, safe.”
Members, including QAnon conspiracy theory supporter Lauren Boebert, refused to comply with new safety protocols yesterday, clashing with officers. The newly-elected congresswoman of Colorado has drawn criticism for tweeting Pelosi’s location during the violent riot last week.
Snapchat will permanently ban Donald Trump, per multiple reports.
“Last week we announced an indefinite suspension of President Trump’s Snapchat account, and have been assessing what long term action is in the best interest of our Snapchat community,” a spokesperson told Axios. “In the interest of public safety, and based on his attempts to spread misinformation, hate speech, and incite violence, which are clear violations of our guidelines, we have made the decision to permanently terminate his account.”
Twitter’s CEO, meanwhile, has weighed in for the first time on the company’s decision to de-platform Trump following the US Capitol attack last week:
Read more analysis of social media companies’ bans and restrictions on Trump’s accounts, from the Guardian’s Kari Paul:
Former governor Rick Snyder has been charged with willful neglect of duty, for his role in the Flint water crisis.Former governor Rick Snyder has been charged with willful neglect of duty, for his role in the Flint water crisis.
In 2014, the city of Flint, Michigan had its water supply switched to the Flint River to save costs. Some 9,000 children, who are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, were exposed to lead-contaminated drinking water.In 2014, the city of Flint, Michigan had its water supply switched to the Flint River to save costs. Some 9,000 children, who are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, were exposed to lead-contaminated drinking water.
The AP reports:The AP reports:
Micah Loewinger and Hampton Stall report:Micah Loewinger and Hampton Stall report:
Audio and chat logs reveal that at least two insurrectionists who broke into the Capitol on 6 January used Zello, a social media walkie-talkie app that critics say has largely ignored a growing far-right user base.Audio and chat logs reveal that at least two insurrectionists who broke into the Capitol on 6 January used Zello, a social media walkie-talkie app that critics say has largely ignored a growing far-right user base.
“We are in the main dome right now,” said a female militia member, speaking on Zello, her voice competing with the cacophony of a clash with Capitol police. “We are rocking it. They’re throwing grenades, they’re frickin’ shooting people with paintballs, but we’re in here.”“We are in the main dome right now,” said a female militia member, speaking on Zello, her voice competing with the cacophony of a clash with Capitol police. “We are rocking it. They’re throwing grenades, they’re frickin’ shooting people with paintballs, but we’re in here.”
“God bless and godspeed. Keep going,” said a male voice from a quiet environment.“God bless and godspeed. Keep going,” said a male voice from a quiet environment.
“Jess, do your shit,” said another. “This is what we fucking lived up for. Everything we fucking trained for.”“Jess, do your shit,” said another. “This is what we fucking lived up for. Everything we fucking trained for.”
The frenzied exchange took place at 2.44pm in a public Zello channel called “STOP THE STEAL J6”, where Trump supporters at home and in Washington DC discussed the riot as it unfolded. Dynamic group conversations like this exemplify why Zello, a smartphone and PC app, has become popular among militias, which have long fetishized military-like communication on analog radio.The frenzied exchange took place at 2.44pm in a public Zello channel called “STOP THE STEAL J6”, where Trump supporters at home and in Washington DC discussed the riot as it unfolded. Dynamic group conversations like this exemplify why Zello, a smartphone and PC app, has become popular among militias, which have long fetishized military-like communication on analog radio.
After years of public pressure, Facebook, Twitter, and Discord have begun to crack down on inciting speech from far-right groups, but Zello has avoided proactive content moderation thus far.After years of public pressure, Facebook, Twitter, and Discord have begun to crack down on inciting speech from far-right groups, but Zello has avoided proactive content moderation thus far.
Most coverage on Zello, which claims to have 150 million users on its free and premium platforms, has focused on its use by the Cajun Navy groups that send boats to save flood victims and grassroots organizing in Venezuela. However, the app is also home to hundreds of far-right channels, which appear to violate its policy prohibiting groups that espouse “violent ideologies”.Most coverage on Zello, which claims to have 150 million users on its free and premium platforms, has focused on its use by the Cajun Navy groups that send boats to save flood victims and grassroots organizing in Venezuela. However, the app is also home to hundreds of far-right channels, which appear to violate its policy prohibiting groups that espouse “violent ideologies”.
Responding to a list of over 800 far-right channels, Zello said it was “prepared to take action on those”. The company also said it was working on a more elaborate response. In addition to locking some public features that would help researchers uncover more extremist content, Zello had begun purging some far-right groups as of Wednesday.Responding to a list of over 800 far-right channels, Zello said it was “prepared to take action on those”. The company also said it was working on a more elaborate response. In addition to locking some public features that would help researchers uncover more extremist content, Zello had begun purging some far-right groups as of Wednesday.
Read more:Read more:
The violent attack on the US Capitol last week followed a Donald Trump speech in which he told his supporters to “fight” for him. “If you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore,” Trump told his supporters. “You’ll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength.”The violent attack on the US Capitol last week followed a Donald Trump speech in which he told his supporters to “fight” for him. “If you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore,” Trump told his supporters. “You’ll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength.”
And yet yesterday, in Alamo, Texas, Trump again insisted: “If you read my speech … people thought that what I said was totally appropriate.”And yet yesterday, in Alamo, Texas, Trump again insisted: “If you read my speech … people thought that what I said was totally appropriate.”
But with an impeachment trial coming up, the president seems to have slightly shifted his rhetoric.But with an impeachment trial coming up, the president seems to have slightly shifted his rhetoric.
Trump, as others in his party have done, also tried to chastise both sides for the violence, despite the fact that it was his supporters who led the attack last week.Trump, as others in his party have done, also tried to chastise both sides for the violence, despite the fact that it was his supporters who led the attack last week.
This year, he said, “we have seen political violence spiral out of control. We have seen too many riots, too many mobs too many acts of intimidation and destruction. It must. Whether you are on the right, or on the left, a Democrat or Republican. There is never a justification for violence. No excuses. no exceptions.”This year, he said, “we have seen political violence spiral out of control. We have seen too many riots, too many mobs too many acts of intimidation and destruction. It must. Whether you are on the right, or on the left, a Democrat or Republican. There is never a justification for violence. No excuses. no exceptions.”
Banned from social media, Donald Trump has released a video statement condemning violence but making no mention of his impeachment and without taking any responsibility for inciting the attack on the Capitol last week.Banned from social media, Donald Trump has released a video statement condemning violence but making no mention of his impeachment and without taking any responsibility for inciting the attack on the Capitol last week.
“Those who engaged in the attacks last week will be brought to justice,” Trump said.“Those who engaged in the attacks last week will be brought to justice,” Trump said.
“Sadly and with a heart broken,” House speaker Nancy Pelosi said, as she signed the impeachment article that will be sent to the Senate.“Sadly and with a heart broken,” House speaker Nancy Pelosi said, as she signed the impeachment article that will be sent to the Senate.
“Donald Trump is a clear and present danger to our country,” she said, and that she was sad about “what this means for our country” as she signed the article accusing Trump of incitement of insurrection.“Donald Trump is a clear and present danger to our country,” she said, and that she was sad about “what this means for our country” as she signed the article accusing Trump of incitement of insurrection.
Meanwhile, the Democrats are huddling on how they’d prosecute.Meanwhile, the Democrats are huddling on how they’d prosecute.
CNN’s Manu Raju:CNN’s Manu Raju:
A lot could happen between now and the impeachment trial...A lot could happen between now and the impeachment trial...
But it remains unclear whether enough Republican senators will vote to convict the president. Pat Toomey, a Republican senator of Pennsylvania, who condemned Trump’s role in inciting violence and called on him to resign, has nevertheless hedged on whether he’d vote to convict.But it remains unclear whether enough Republican senators will vote to convict the president. Pat Toomey, a Republican senator of Pennsylvania, who condemned Trump’s role in inciting violence and called on him to resign, has nevertheless hedged on whether he’d vote to convict.
Whether the Senate can convict a president after leaving office is “debatable” Toomey said in a statement. “Should the Senate conduct a trial, I will again fulfill my responsibility to consider arguments from both the House managers and President Trump’s lawyers,” he said.Whether the Senate can convict a president after leaving office is “debatable” Toomey said in a statement. “Should the Senate conduct a trial, I will again fulfill my responsibility to consider arguments from both the House managers and President Trump’s lawyers,” he said.
Trump’s second impeachment has led to some strong responses from political commentators, including former US labor secretary and Guardian US columnist Robert Reich:Trump’s second impeachment has led to some strong responses from political commentators, including former US labor secretary and Guardian US columnist Robert Reich:
The Senate’s leading Democrat, Chuck Schumer responds to the Trump impeachment: “A Senate trial can begin immediately, with agreement from the current Senate Majority Leader to reconvene the Senate for an emergency session, or it will begin after January 19th. But make no mistake, there will be an impeachment trial in the United States Senate”The Senate’s leading Democrat, Chuck Schumer responds to the Trump impeachment: “A Senate trial can begin immediately, with agreement from the current Senate Majority Leader to reconvene the Senate for an emergency session, or it will begin after January 19th. But make no mistake, there will be an impeachment trial in the United States Senate”
“Despite the efforts of Donald Trump and violent insurrectionists, America is not a dictatorship,” Schumer said.” We have been and will forever remain a Democracy that respects and reveres the rule of law, including the bedrock principle that the voters choose our leaders – that just power can only derive from the consent of the governed.”“Despite the efforts of Donald Trump and violent insurrectionists, America is not a dictatorship,” Schumer said.” We have been and will forever remain a Democracy that respects and reveres the rule of law, including the bedrock principle that the voters choose our leaders – that just power can only derive from the consent of the governed.”