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UK Covid live: all over-18s in England should be eligible for jabs from end of this week, says NHS boss Daniel Morgan murder: Priti Patel makes statement after report finds police ‘institutionally corrupt’ – live
(32 minutes later)
Latest updates: Simon Stevens says he expects bookings to open for all over-18s from later this week Home secretary to make statement in Commons after independent report finds Met was ‘institutionally corrupt’ in its handling of 1987 case
Theresa May, the Conservative former PM who set up the panel when she was home secretary, says the report provides yet another example of “an organ of the state, whose job was to protect the public, prioritising the reputation of the institution over the delivery of justice”.
Patel tells Thomas-Symonds that the government will consider the recommendation about a duty of candour.
Nick Thomas-Symonds, the shadow home secretary, responds for Labour.
He says paragraph 60 of the report is particularly shocking. It says:
He says the report recommends a “duty of candour” on law enforcement agencies. He asks if the government will accept this, particularly in the light of the Covid inquiry due to start next year.
Patel says the government tightened laws on police corruption when Theresa May was home secretary.
But she says the government must respond to this report.
She says she is writing to Cressida Dick, the Met commissioner, asking for a detailed response to the panel’s recommendations.
She says she has also written to Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services asking it to consider the issues raised by the report.
And she also announces a review of the effectiveness of the Independent Office for Police Conduct.
Priti Patel, the home secretary, says no redactions to the report were required. But she had to take account of national security issues, he says.
The report is over 1,200 pages long, she says.
It is “deeply alarming” and finds examples of corrupt behaviour, not limited to the first investigation.
She says the report accuses the Metropolitan police of a form of institutional corruption.
We look to the police to protect us, she says. She says the overwhelming majority of officers used their powers properly. But it is terrible when officers misuse this power.
She says this has been “one of the most devastating episodes in the history of the Metropolitan police”.
The full report from the Daniel Morgan independent panel is here. It runs to three volumes.
Here is a statement (pdf) from Nuala O’Loan, the crossbench peer who chaired the panel.
And here is an extract from O’Loan’s statement.
Priti Patel, the home secretary, is about to make a statement about the Daniel Morgan murder inquiry report.Priti Patel, the home secretary, is about to make a statement about the Daniel Morgan murder inquiry report.
Our story on what the report says is here.Our story on what the report says is here.
Savanta ComRes has released some snap polling on the PM’s announcement last night about the four-week delay in lifting the remaining Covid restrictions for England.Savanta ComRes has released some snap polling on the PM’s announcement last night about the four-week delay in lifting the remaining Covid restrictions for England.
Only 13% of people thought the rules should have been lifted on 21 June as originally planned, the poll suggests.Only 13% of people thought the rules should have been lifted on 21 June as originally planned, the poll suggests.
Another 31% support 19 July (the new date set by Boris Johnson) as the best time to lift the remaining restrictions.Another 31% support 19 July (the new date set by Boris Johnson) as the best time to lift the remaining restrictions.
But 43% think that Johnson calls the “terminus date” should come later, the poll suggests. But 43% think that what Johnson calls the “terminus date” should come later, the poll suggests.
But when the question about the PM’s decision is framed in a different way, a majority of voters support it, the poll suggests.But when the question about the PM’s decision is framed in a different way, a majority of voters support it, the poll suggests.
Although the UK has made progress this morning on trade ties in the southern hemisphere (see 10.10am, 11.24am and 12.03pm), relations with its largest trading partner, which is on its doorstep, remain problematic. This morning Mairead McGuinness, the European commissioner for financial services, told an Irish parliamentary meeting that, if the UK takes further unilateral action to undermine the Northern Ireland protocol, the EU will retaliate. She said:Although the UK has made progress this morning on trade ties in the southern hemisphere (see 10.10am, 11.24am and 12.03pm), relations with its largest trading partner, which is on its doorstep, remain problematic. This morning Mairead McGuinness, the European commissioner for financial services, told an Irish parliamentary meeting that, if the UK takes further unilateral action to undermine the Northern Ireland protocol, the EU will retaliate. She said:
Scott Morrison, the Australian prime minister, has said that the trade deal with the UK is “the most comprehensive and ambitious agreement that Australia has concluded”. The only similar one is Australia’s deal with New Zealand, he said.Scott Morrison, the Australian prime minister, has said that the trade deal with the UK is “the most comprehensive and ambitious agreement that Australia has concluded”. The only similar one is Australia’s deal with New Zealand, he said.
Speaking at No 10, Morrison also that the deal could “open the pathway” for the UK’s entry into the the CPTPP (Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership). He said:Speaking at No 10, Morrison also that the deal could “open the pathway” for the UK’s entry into the the CPTPP (Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership). He said:
Labour has sought to capitalise on what it thinks is one of the strongest lines of attack against the delay in lifting restrictions across England, blaming Boris Johnson for letting the Delta variant that originated in India seep through Britain’s “lax” borders.Labour has sought to capitalise on what it thinks is one of the strongest lines of attack against the delay in lifting restrictions across England, blaming Boris Johnson for letting the Delta variant that originated in India seep through Britain’s “lax” borders.
In a speech this morning, Nick Thomas-Symonds, the shadow home secretary, said the “Johnson variant” had only fuelled so many case rises because of ministers’ “negligence and incompetence”.In a speech this morning, Nick Thomas-Symonds, the shadow home secretary, said the “Johnson variant” had only fuelled so many case rises because of ministers’ “negligence and incompetence”.
Trying to counter the government’s dismissal that “hindsight is a wonderful thing”, Thomas-Symonds said India should have been put on the red list 14 days earlier, when Pakistan and Bangladesh were - dubbing the wait a “fortnight of failure”. He said:Trying to counter the government’s dismissal that “hindsight is a wonderful thing”, Thomas-Symonds said India should have been put on the red list 14 days earlier, when Pakistan and Bangladesh were - dubbing the wait a “fortnight of failure”. He said:
Thomas-Symonds told the Guardian that Johnson only delayed putting India on the red list because he wanted a photo op with the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, at a trade agreement signing, branding the prime minister “unbelievably reckless”.Thomas-Symonds told the Guardian that Johnson only delayed putting India on the red list because he wanted a photo op with the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, at a trade agreement signing, branding the prime minister “unbelievably reckless”.
Ahead of a vote in parliament tomorrow on extending restrictions which Labour will support, Thomas-Symonds emphasised that he wants 19 July to be the final stage of unlocking - but “whether it will be, will depend upon the measures the government actually takes”.Ahead of a vote in parliament tomorrow on extending restrictions which Labour will support, Thomas-Symonds emphasised that he wants 19 July to be the final stage of unlocking - but “whether it will be, will depend upon the measures the government actually takes”.
Ideas he suggested included increasing financial support for people who need to self-isolate or rely on statutory sick pay, and scrapping the amber list, meaning any travellers arriving from risky countries would have to pay to quarantine in a hotel for 14 days.Ideas he suggested included increasing financial support for people who need to self-isolate or rely on statutory sick pay, and scrapping the amber list, meaning any travellers arriving from risky countries would have to pay to quarantine in a hotel for 14 days.
Labour’s popularity has plunged since the vaccine rollout got under way and Johnson set out the roadmap out of lockdown back in February, leaving the party searching for an effective series of attack lines that resonate strongly with the public.Labour’s popularity has plunged since the vaccine rollout got under way and Johnson set out the roadmap out of lockdown back in February, leaving the party searching for an effective series of attack lines that resonate strongly with the public.
Given opinion polls suggest the majority of people back keeping restrictions in place for another month, Labour’s focus will be on painting this latest delay as avoidable. In particular, expect it to point to a figure from the Civil Aviation Authority, which said 20,000 passengers arrived from India in the two weeks before it was put on the red list.Given opinion polls suggest the majority of people back keeping restrictions in place for another month, Labour’s focus will be on painting this latest delay as avoidable. In particular, expect it to point to a figure from the Civil Aviation Authority, which said 20,000 passengers arrived from India in the two weeks before it was put on the red list.
Whether the public will let that fly, remains to be seen.Whether the public will let that fly, remains to be seen.
Speaking at the NHS Confederation annual conference, Sir Simon Stevens, the NHS England chief executive, said that over the next few months a new treatment for Covid may become available. He said:
Stevens also said that the age profile of Covid patients being hospitalised now had changed dramatically since January. He explained:
Boris Johnson has said that the free trade deal with Australia will “benefit British farmers”. Speaking at No 10 after agreeing the deal with Scott Morrison, his Australian counterpart, he said:
The National Farmers’ Union has strongly contested the claim that their members will benefit from the deal. Last month, when it was first reported that the deal would allow Australian farmers tariff-free access to the UK market after a 15-year transition, the NFU said: “We continue to maintain that a tariff-free trade deal with Australia will jeopardise our own farming industry and will cause the demise of many, many beef and sheep farms throughout the UK. This is true whether tariffs are dropped immediately or in 15 years’ time.”
Johnson also said a key benefit of the deal was that it would increase the chances of the UK being able to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), one of the largest free trade areas in the world covering 11 Pacific nations. He said:
And Johnson has posted this on Twitter.
All adults in England should be able to book a coronavirus vaccination by the end of this week, Sir Simon Stevens, the NHS England chief executive, said this morning.
Speaking to the NHS Confederation annual conference, Stevens said:
Mark Harper, the Conservative MP who chairs the Covid Recovery Group, which represents anti-lockdown or lockdown-sceptic backbenchers, told LBC this morning that he thought the government could have gone ahead “perfectly safely” with removing all remaining restrictions for England on 21 June, as originally planned. Harper said:
Tony Hall, the former BBC director general, is currently getting monstered by the Commons culture committee over what happened with Martin Bashir, and particularly over the BBC’s decision to rehire Bashir when some executives knew how he had obtained the Diana interview. My colleague Kevin Rawlinson is covering it on a separate live blog. It’s here.
UK unemployment fell for the fourth month in a row in April as businesses took on more staff in response to the relaxation of Covid-19 restrictions, my colleague Richard Partington reports.
There were 98 deaths registered in England and Wales in the week ending 4 June involving coronavirus, according to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics. They accounted for 1.3% of all deaths registered that week. The previous week Covid deaths accounted for 1% of all deaths.
No 10 has announced that Boris Johnson and his Australian counterpart, Scott Morrison, have agreed a free trade deal. It is significant because, although the UK has agreed plenty of other trade deals since Brexit, until now those have all been deals that predominantly just replicate the trade deals the UK had as a member of the EU. This one is genuinely new.
The full text of an “agreement in principle” will be published in the coming days, No 10 says, but here are the main points from the No 10 press release.
The deal will eliminate tariffs on all UK goods going to Australia, No 10 says. UK-Australia trade was worth £13.9bn in 2020, and No 10 says this is now set to grow.
British households will save up to £34m per year because of tariff cuts making Australian imports cheaper, No 10 says. But given that there are around 28m households in the UK, this saving is minimal. It amounts to an average saving of about £1.20 per household.
British farmers will be protected for 15 years “using tariff-rate quotas and other safeguards”, No 10 says.
The deal includes measures to allow Britons under the age of 35 to travel and work in Australia more freely, No 10 says.
No 10 says industries that employ 3.5 million people in the UK could benefit. It names car manufacturing, Scotch whisky, confectionery, biscuits and ceramics as sectors that will benefit from tariff-free access to the Australian market.
The 13,000 small and medium-sized businesses that already export to Australia will face less bureaucracy, No 10 says.
Here is my colleague Peter Walker’s story on the deal.
Good morning. Following last night’s announcement about the four-week delay to the easing of the remaining lockdown restrictions in England, Michael Gove, the Cabinet Office minister, has been touring the studios this morning. A lot of what he said echoed what Boris Johnson said at his press conference, but two lines stood out from his Today interview.
Gove suggested the UK would have to learn to live with Covid deaths at a certain level. Asked if the country could end up having hundreds of deaths a day after restrictions get lifted in July, as Prof Graham Medley, a government adviser, told the programme might happen, Gove replied:
When asked if that meant living with hundreds of deaths a day, Gove did not deny the possibility, but he stressed he was not an epidemiologist. Asked if a long-term death toll like this might be acceptable, Gove replied:
Earlier Medley, professor of infectious disease modelling at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), told the programme that Covid deaths could rise to hundreds per day after the lifting of all remaining restrictions. “I think that’s quite possible it’s not a certainty,” he said. “There is a lot of uncertainty, but I think that’s quite possible.”
Gove did not rule out some Covid restrictions continuing beyond July. And he also suggested that partial working from home would become permanent for some people. Asked if restrictions might continue until the spring, he said the government wanted to get rid of every possible restriction. He went on:
When it was put to him that he was not ruling out restrictions continuing until the spring, he did not challenge this.
Here is the agenda for the day.
9.30am: The ONS publishes its weekly death figures for England and Wales.
9.30am: Nick Thomas-Symonds, the shadow home secretary, gives a speech on border controls.
9.45am: Sir Simon Stevens, the outgoing NHS England chief executive, gives a speech to the NHS Confederation conference.
10am: Lord Hall, the former director general of the BBC, gives evidence to the Commons culture committee about the Martin Bashir/Diana interview scandal; he will be followed by Lord Birt, another former DG at 10.45am and by Tim Davie, the current DG, and Richard Sharp, the BBC chair, at 11.30am.
10am: Amanda Spielman, the chief inspector of schools, gives evidence to the Commons education committee about sexual abuse in schools.
11.30m: Michael Gove, the Cabinet Office minister, gives a speech on civil service reform.
12pm: Downing Street is expected to hold its daily lobby briefing.
12.30pm: Priti Patel, the home secretary, delivers a Commons statement to mark the publication of the report into the murder of Daniel Morgan.
2.20pm: Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, gives a statement to MSPs about Covid.
Politics Live has been a mix of Covid and non-Covid news recently, and that will probably be the case today. For global coronavirus developments, do read our global live blog.
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