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Newspaper headlines: UK to 'rip up' border deal and 'Dame Debs' honoured Newspaper headlines: UK to 'rip up' border deal and 'Dame Debs' honoured
(about 13 hours later)
With several front pages focusing on tensions over the post-Brexit trade deal for Northern Ireland, the Daily Express headline says that a "defiant" Foreign Secretary Liz Truss has warned: "We'll rip up Brexit border deal". The paper says Ms Truss told the EU she may have "no choice", because the deal's border checks between Britain and Northern Ireland were endangering peace.
The i newspaper says the House of Lords is planning to delay the foreign secretary's plan to scrap the Northern Ireland Protocol, with peers able to obstruct it for a year. The paper says the UK believes it could lawfully end the deal unilaterally, but is prepared for delays to pass the necessary legislation.
Lord Frost, the man who negotiated the Brexit deal, writes in the Daily Telegraph that Prime Minister Boris Johnson must show the same leadership he displayed in the Ukraine war by ripping up the Northern Ireland Protocol. He says the Good Friday Agreement, which has underpinned peace in the nation since 1998, was now "on life support" due to the border checks between Northern Ireland and Great Britain.
Meanwhile, a delegation of US congressmen is flying to London amid concerns that tensions over the protocol could put peace and stability at risk, the Guardian reports. It says the group is led by Richie Neal, a committee chair who has "significant power" over any future UK and US trade deal, who has warned it cannot progress if there is "any jeopardy" to the Good Friday Agreement.
"She's Dame Debs" is the headline on the front of the Sun, as the paper celebrates a damehood for cancer campaigner, BBC podcast host and the paper's own columnist Deborah James. The paper says Ms James "captured the hearts of the nation" with her honest accounts of her bowel cancer and has raised £3.6m since she revealed she was receiving end-of-life care this week.
One in five civil service jobs - about 91,000 staff - will be axed, according to the Daily Mail, with Prime Minister Boris Johnson suggesting he will use the £3.5bn savings to tackle the cost of living crisis with tax cuts. "We have got to cut the cost of government to cut the cost of living," Mr Johnson tells the paper.
But the Times's lead story features a warning from former Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, who says the Tories could lose the next election over voters' deep concerns about the cost of living. Mr Hunt, who is not ruling out a leadership bid, tells the paper that the loss of nearly 500 seats in the local elections was not just "mid-term blues" and Boris Johnson has a "big mountain to climb".
"The home of UK's worst Covid law-breakers" says the Daily Mirror's front page, alongside a picture of the Downing Street sign. The paper says that the 100 fixed penalty notices now issued by police to "people in power who MADE the rules" is a record.
Metro's front page features a series of stills taken from a video in which Russian soldiers aim their rifles from behind two Ukrainian civilians, who are then seen to fall to the ground - one dead, one dying, the paper explains. It says the video of the killing is the clearest evidence yet of Russian war crimes and adds that the atrocity is one of 10,000 being investigated by the authorities in Kyiv.
The lead story in the Financial Times reports on "one of the toughest challenges" to the $1.3tn crypto-currency industry as a popular digital coin, Tether, failed to maintain its promise of parity with the US dollar. The paper says the drop to a low of 95.11 cents is a threat to the wider stability of crypto markets and is leading to calls for regulation.
"Keep yer hair on!" cries the Daily Star's front page, as the paper reports on an employment tribunal case in which an electrician won a payout for sexual harassment because his male boss mocked him for being bald. The paper calls it a "hair-raising" tale.
The Daily Mail leads on the prime minister's plan to drastically reduce the size of the civil service.The Daily Mail leads on the prime minister's plan to drastically reduce the size of the civil service.
Boris Johnson tells the paper the civil service is "swollen" after growing during the pandemic and says the cost of government must be cut, to reduce the cost of living.Boris Johnson tells the paper the civil service is "swollen" after growing during the pandemic and says the cost of government must be cut, to reduce the cost of living.
The Mail says slashing the number of jobs by a fifth would save about £3.5bn a year, freeing up resources for measures including tax cuts.The Mail says slashing the number of jobs by a fifth would save about £3.5bn a year, freeing up resources for measures including tax cuts.
The paper's editorial predicts intense opposition from Labour and unions, but says a bonfire of bureaucrats is long overdue.The paper's editorial predicts intense opposition from Labour and unions, but says a bonfire of bureaucrats is long overdue.
The Daily Telegraph highlights a call from the government's former Brexit negotiator, Lord Frost, for Boris Johnson to do what he says is the "right thing" in tearing up the Northern Ireland Protocol on post-Brexit trading arrangements.The Daily Telegraph highlights a call from the government's former Brexit negotiator, Lord Frost, for Boris Johnson to do what he says is the "right thing" in tearing up the Northern Ireland Protocol on post-Brexit trading arrangements.
In an article for the paper, Lord Frost says action is needed even if it means a confrontation with the EU.In an article for the paper, Lord Frost says action is needed even if it means a confrontation with the EU.
The i reports that peers are ready to obstruct the legislation needed to scrap parts of the protocol, possibly delaying its implementation by up to a year.The i reports that peers are ready to obstruct the legislation needed to scrap parts of the protocol, possibly delaying its implementation by up to a year.
Spiralling tensions over the future of Northern Ireland have prompted the White House to despatch a team of congressmen for meetings in London, Dublin, Brussels and Belfast, according to the Guardian.Spiralling tensions over the future of Northern Ireland have prompted the White House to despatch a team of congressmen for meetings in London, Dublin, Brussels and Belfast, according to the Guardian.
The Daily Mirror, leading on yesterday's fresh round of Westminster lockdown fines, says Downing Street is now the home of the UK's worst Covid law-breakers.The Daily Mirror, leading on yesterday's fresh round of Westminster lockdown fines, says Downing Street is now the home of the UK's worst Covid law-breakers.
The paper reports that junior staff are "apoplectic" about being made to carry the can for Partygate and are preparing to take revenge on the prime minister by "revealing all" about his handling of the pandemic to the public inquiry due next year.The paper reports that junior staff are "apoplectic" about being made to carry the can for Partygate and are preparing to take revenge on the prime minister by "revealing all" about his handling of the pandemic to the public inquiry due next year.
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The Times is among the papers to report that moon dust collected by Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong has been used to grow plants for the first time - heralding what the paper calls a new era of lunar farming.The Times is among the papers to report that moon dust collected by Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong has been used to grow plants for the first time - heralding what the paper calls a new era of lunar farming.
Scientists added water and a solution of nutrients to a thimbleful of moon dust, the paper says. After planting a seed from a weed known as mouse-ear cress, shoots apparently emerged with green leaves.Scientists added water and a solution of nutrients to a thimbleful of moon dust, the paper says. After planting a seed from a weed known as mouse-ear cress, shoots apparently emerged with green leaves.
But the Guardian says the plants were stunted compared with those grown in volcanic ash, and showed signs of physiological distress.But the Guardian says the plants were stunted compared with those grown in volcanic ash, and showed signs of physiological distress.
Several papers highlight an employment tribunal ruling that insulting a man for being bald is sexual harassment.Several papers highlight an employment tribunal ruling that insulting a man for being bald is sexual harassment.
After hearing a case between an electrician and the firm that dismissed him, three male judges are said to have noted their own lack of hair, as they concluded that insults about hair loss are also discriminatory, because baldness is more prevalent in men.After hearing a case between an electrician and the firm that dismissed him, three male judges are said to have noted their own lack of hair, as they concluded that insults about hair loss are also discriminatory, because baldness is more prevalent in men.
"She's Dame Debs" is the headline for the Sun, as it highlights the damehood being given to Deborah James, days after she revealed she's receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer."She's Dame Debs" is the headline for the Sun, as it highlights the damehood being given to Deborah James, days after she revealed she's receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer.
The paper says her heart-wrenching honesty inspired the nation - in particular Prince William - who the Sun says has been working hard behind the scenes to make sure she was given the honour.The paper says her heart-wrenching honesty inspired the nation - in particular Prince William - who the Sun says has been working hard behind the scenes to make sure she was given the honour.
Deborah James tells the paper she's blown away and that words can't describe what it means for her family.Deborah James tells the paper she's blown away and that words can't describe what it means for her family.
THE DARK SIDE OF FIGURE SKATING: How enormous pressure can lead young skaters to eating disordersTHE DARK SIDE OF FIGURE SKATING: How enormous pressure can lead young skaters to eating disorders
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