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Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates
(32 minutes later)
Crowds of students in Delhi are blocking the road near to Lodhi Gardens, chanting “What do we want? Climate justice”. “You can’t run away from climate change,” reads one sign. Guardian environment journalist Fiona Harvey will be on hand to answer any questions you have about the climate crisis between 1.30pm and 2.30pm BST.
Delhi is one of 21 cities that is predicted to run out of groundwater by 2020, according to the Indian government’s policy thinktank, Niti Aayog. You can share your questions now via our form here, or in the comments below but please @Fiona so that they’ll be easier for us to find.
The ⁦⁦@guardian⁩ office at 12:28pm today #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/HbEQNwldvP
The US is set to stage its largest ever day of protest over the climate crisis, with tens of thousands of students set to be joined by adults in abandoning schools and workplaces for a wave of strikes across the country.
Climate strikes will take place in more than 1,000 locations, with major rallies in New York, Washington DC, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco and Miami.
The young strikers’ totemic figure, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, will take part in the New York walkout and will speak to massed protesters in Manhattan.
Authorities in New York City have announced that its student population of 1.1 million is allowed to skip school in order to attend the strikes.
Dozens of companies, including Patagonia and Ben and Jerry’s, will support striking staff, with major unions also backing the walkouts.
Dulce Belen Ceballos Arias, an 18-year-old from San Francisco, said she will be striking because “I want children of my own and I want them to have a better life than me. I don’t want that to be taken away by climate change.”
Students in Boston will also be excused school, with a crowd of 10,000 expected to assemble. “We are excited to disrupt business as usual, to demand a Green New Deal,” said Audrey Maurine Xin Lin, an 18-year-old organizer in Boston, in reference to the resolution put forward by progressive Democrats to enact a second world war-style mobilization to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions.
A big difference on today’s march in London is the presence of trade union activists alongside young people and their parents, writes Guardian environment correspondent Matthew Taylor,
Graham Petersen, from the UCU lecturers’ union and member of the green jobs alliance, said unions had to take a lead in the climate fight.
This is going to be the defining issue for future generations and if we are not involved now how are we going to be relevant to the young people here today when they go into work.
Trade unions around the world are backing today’s protests and Petersen said it was “about time” they engaged in the climate crisis.
In the UK it is difficult because people have their hands full with austerity and precarious jobs but unions are starting to realise that if we get the climate justice policies right we can tackle not just the climate but also a wider social justice issues.
Trade unionists join today’s climate march in London.“This is going to be the defining issue for future generations and if we are not involved now how are we going to be relevant to the young people here today.” pic.twitter.com/JtxKByvwfc
Lois Borny has been speaking to young people on the London march, including student Noemie, who told her:
It’s depressing knowing you’re waking up to not such a bright future. The climate crisis has always been in the back of my mind, but I always used to be a bit of a pessimist ... now that the movement has gained traction you get the feeling that you can change something.
When asked what she thinks about the fact children are leading the movement she says:
It almost seems like a game for them [the politicians]. They aren’t taking it seriously. This isn’t for fun or just for the sake of it. It’s real and urgent.
It is Nazreen’s first day in London, having arrived from Malaysia yesterday. The 22-year-old, who is studying political philosophy, said:
I’m happy this is happening because at home we have a big haze problem, because of forests being burned in Borneo.
Nazreen says that if we were in Borneo, from where we are standing (by the stage) the Houses of Parliament would be unrecognisable from the haze.
Borneo is burning. It has one of the oldest rainforest in the world and half of it is gone. We are really proud of our rainforests, but what is there to be proud of when it is gone?
He says that it is good children are leading the movement, because it is allowing them to see “what is happening in the real world”.
A small but noisy crowd gathered in the financial district of Sandton in Johannesburg, outside the offices of Sasol, a huge South African energy and chemical company.
Natalie Kapsosideris, 16, said:
We don’t really have a way out of this. The future looks really dismal at this point. There’s not going to be a lot of food available, there will be droughts, floods, natural disasters. The fact that Sasol gets away with stealing our future from us ... and it’s all because they want to make money.
Tariro Banganayi, 18, a student at Sacred Heart college, said:
It’s important that I lend my voice to this cause ... a lot of people who aren’t as privileged as I am don’t have the opportunity to speak out against these sorts of issues, who live where the air is unbreathable, where toxic waste is dumped in rivers, those people don’t have a voice to speak out ... Also I am here to educate people about these issues and to get as much information from as many different places as I can ... I am going to try to diversify the way that I raise awareness ... I am going to use my social media a lot more effectively, I am going to centre my conversations with my friends, I am going to bring it up at the dinner table with my family ... because if every person tells one person then we can tell everybody.
Crowds of students in Delhi are blocking the road near to Lodhi Gardens, chanting: “What do we want? Climate justice.” “You can’t run away from climate change,” reads one sign.
Delhi is one of 21 cities predicted to run out of groundwater by 2020, according to the Indian government’s policy thinktank, Niti Aayog.
It is also one of the most polluted cities in the world.“The lungs of an 11 year old have black spots on them,” Shivam, a law student, says. “This is why we have to change things now.”It is also one of the most polluted cities in the world.“The lungs of an 11 year old have black spots on them,” Shivam, a law student, says. “This is why we have to change things now.”
In Exeter, the protest is in full swing. Leon Hayton-Twigg, 11, (pictured below) with his brother Lucas and his friend Ossian Finn, says: “We have come here to show the people there’s a problem and we want it to stop.” In Exeter, the protest is in full swing. Leon Hayton-Twigg, 11, (pictured below with his brother Lucas and his friend Ossian Finn, 10) says: “We have come here to show the people there’s a problem and we want it to stop.”
More of the protest signs from the Exeter protest ... More of the protest signs from the Exeter strikes ...
Archie Graham, 15, and his friends were supposed to be in school today but felt compelled to join Manchester’s climate strike, while still rocking their school ties.Archie Graham, 15, and his friends were supposed to be in school today but felt compelled to join Manchester’s climate strike, while still rocking their school ties.
He said:He said:
What’s the point in going to school if we can’t use that knowledge in the future because there won’t be a future for us.What’s the point in going to school if we can’t use that knowledge in the future because there won’t be a future for us.
His friend, Sam Pembroke, added:His friend, Sam Pembroke, added:
It’s really important because there’s no second chance - this is the only chance we have. If this carries on it’s just going to end.It’s really important because there’s no second chance - this is the only chance we have. If this carries on it’s just going to end.
Their friend, Santana Daza, 15, said they might get in trouble for bunking off school but it was worth it:Their friend, Santana Daza, 15, said they might get in trouble for bunking off school but it was worth it:
I think it definitely does make a difference. They encourage us to learn about it but we all know about climate change - we don’t need to be educated about it, it’s more about taking action.I think it definitely does make a difference. They encourage us to learn about it but we all know about climate change - we don’t need to be educated about it, it’s more about taking action.
Herding a group of six placard-carrying children, Kitty Rostron, 40, said her seven-year-old daughter Margot watches Greta Thunberg on YouTube and asks:Herding a group of six placard-carrying children, Kitty Rostron, 40, said her seven-year-old daughter Margot watches Greta Thunberg on YouTube and asks:
Why is this happening? Why is Boris Johnson not doing anything? Why do people not make good decisions about climate change?Why is this happening? Why is Boris Johnson not doing anything? Why do people not make good decisions about climate change?
Her friend Karine Joshua, 39, said it was important to bring children along so they understand what is happening to the environment:Her friend Karine Joshua, 39, said it was important to bring children along so they understand what is happening to the environment:
There’s a real crisis right now, not in 10, 20 years time. Action is needed now so we’re trying to teach them if we come together and show our support hopefully we can make a change.There’s a real crisis right now, not in 10, 20 years time. Action is needed now so we’re trying to teach them if we come together and show our support hopefully we can make a change.
Archie Graham, 15, and his mates were supposed to be in school today: “What’s the point in going to school if we can’t use that knowledge in future because there won’t be a future for us?” pic.twitter.com/iydpMOSL19Archie Graham, 15, and his mates were supposed to be in school today: “What’s the point in going to school if we can’t use that knowledge in future because there won’t be a future for us?” pic.twitter.com/iydpMOSL19
Here is a selection of images from other climate strikers:Here is a selection of images from other climate strikers:
#ClimateStrike Bristol pic.twitter.com/y6xAxJEXjw#ClimateStrike Bristol pic.twitter.com/y6xAxJEXjw
Huge turnout for today’s #ClimateStrike in Oxford - west end of Broadstreet and Cornmarket completely full pic.twitter.com/oBgb8WBrr1Huge turnout for today’s #ClimateStrike in Oxford - west end of Broadstreet and Cornmarket completely full pic.twitter.com/oBgb8WBrr1
Amazing scenes on Brighton sea front right now. This goes on for miles. pic.twitter.com/Z6BKVXYClNAmazing scenes on Brighton sea front right now. This goes on for miles. pic.twitter.com/Z6BKVXYClN
#ClimateActionNow strikes already unfolding across the globe — these are some of the first views out of Australia of thousands taking to the streets for the global #climatestrike — major events in Ann Arbor and Detroit today. pic.twitter.com/iTjYTGIgK7#ClimateActionNow strikes already unfolding across the globe — these are some of the first views out of Australia of thousands taking to the streets for the global #climatestrike — major events in Ann Arbor and Detroit today. pic.twitter.com/iTjYTGIgK7
#Climatestrike #Paris pic.twitter.com/AKapTJB8FB#Climatestrike #Paris pic.twitter.com/AKapTJB8FB
Thousands of protesters have come today to join the climate strike in #Dortmund. #ClimateStrike #FridaysForFuture #Klimastreiks pic.twitter.com/CfAUKpNcjnThousands of protesters have come today to join the climate strike in #Dortmund. #ClimateStrike #FridaysForFuture #Klimastreiks pic.twitter.com/CfAUKpNcjn
Hello, this is Haroon Siddique taking over from Sarah. The video below shows a small proportion of the staff who walked out at the Guardian. If you want to get in touch, please tweet me @Haroon_SiddiqueHello, this is Haroon Siddique taking over from Sarah. The video below shows a small proportion of the staff who walked out at the Guardian. If you want to get in touch, please tweet me @Haroon_Siddique
#ClimateStrike at the Guardian pic.twitter.com/MqoUDukDMD#ClimateStrike at the Guardian pic.twitter.com/MqoUDukDMD
The Guardian live blog will be closing from noon (12:00 BST) until 12.30 BST as we are participating in a solidarity strike. When it resumes, my colleague Haroon Siddique will be taking over.The Guardian live blog will be closing from noon (12:00 BST) until 12.30 BST as we are participating in a solidarity strike. When it resumes, my colleague Haroon Siddique will be taking over.
In an email to staff explaining why we are walking out for 30 minutes, Guardian editor in chief, Katharine Viner, said:In an email to staff explaining why we are walking out for 30 minutes, Guardian editor in chief, Katharine Viner, said:
We fully support this global campaign, and we want colleagues to feel able to show solidarity with campaigners - so we are happy to support this activity across the organisation.We fully support this global campaign, and we want colleagues to feel able to show solidarity with campaigners - so we are happy to support this activity across the organisation.
Sadiq Khan is not the only mayor who has come out strongly behind today’s strikes.Sadiq Khan is not the only mayor who has come out strongly behind today’s strikes.
The leaders of Paris, New York City, Los Angeles and Copenhagen released a strongly worded joint statement overnight.The leaders of Paris, New York City, Los Angeles and Copenhagen released a strongly worded joint statement overnight.
Our shared planet is facing a climate emergency. The science is clear that, without urgent action, sea levels will rise further, extreme temperatures will become the norm and climate-related disasters will inflict even greater damage. We are making historic investments to prepare and adapt our cities to the inevitable consequences of emissions already released into the atmosphere.Our shared planet is facing a climate emergency. The science is clear that, without urgent action, sea levels will rise further, extreme temperatures will become the norm and climate-related disasters will inflict even greater damage. We are making historic investments to prepare and adapt our cities to the inevitable consequences of emissions already released into the atmosphere.
When your house is on fire, somebody needs to sound the alarm. Young people in our cities, displaying incredible maturity and dignity are doing just that. School children are taking to the streets, drawing attention to the terrifying threat that climate breakdown poses to their future. Young people recognise just how unfair climate change is. Those who have generated the least greenhouse gas emissions, including the poorest, most disadvantaged and youngest in society, will suffer the worst effects of a rapidly changing global climate. They are right to sound the alarm, and they are right to demand action that tackles climate change and inequality simultaneously.When your house is on fire, somebody needs to sound the alarm. Young people in our cities, displaying incredible maturity and dignity are doing just that. School children are taking to the streets, drawing attention to the terrifying threat that climate breakdown poses to their future. Young people recognise just how unfair climate change is. Those who have generated the least greenhouse gas emissions, including the poorest, most disadvantaged and youngest in society, will suffer the worst effects of a rapidly changing global climate. They are right to sound the alarm, and they are right to demand action that tackles climate change and inequality simultaneously.
On September 20, these inspiring young leaders have called for adults to join them for a Global Climate Strike. We have an opportunity to show, not only that we hear their message, but that they have inspired us to act even faster.On September 20, these inspiring young leaders have called for adults to join them for a Global Climate Strike. We have an opportunity to show, not only that we hear their message, but that they have inspired us to act even faster.
As mayors, our greatest responsibility is to protect the lives and wellbeing of those that live in our cities. As adults, our obligation is to leave the world in a better state for our children than we inherited it. Fortunately, the evidence is increasingly clear that transforming our cities to prevent the climate crisis will also make them healthier, more equitable, safer and ultimately better places to live. The cities of the future will enjoy affordable and reliable public transport; the air will be free from poisonous toxins; buildings will generate zero emissions thanks to ultra-high efficient heating, cooling and insulation; waste will be recycled or reused, and all of this will be powered by abundant renewable energy. We have a unique opportunity to bestow a bright and hopeful legacy to the next generation. This is the future we want.As mayors, our greatest responsibility is to protect the lives and wellbeing of those that live in our cities. As adults, our obligation is to leave the world in a better state for our children than we inherited it. Fortunately, the evidence is increasingly clear that transforming our cities to prevent the climate crisis will also make them healthier, more equitable, safer and ultimately better places to live. The cities of the future will enjoy affordable and reliable public transport; the air will be free from poisonous toxins; buildings will generate zero emissions thanks to ultra-high efficient heating, cooling and insulation; waste will be recycled or reused, and all of this will be powered by abundant renewable energy. We have a unique opportunity to bestow a bright and hopeful legacy to the next generation. This is the future we want.
That is why we are supporting the Global Climate Strikes. Mayors around the world, working through C40 Cities, are committed to deliver on the Paris Agreement and taking action to peak their emissions as our cities already have and bring them down sharply by 2030. Many businesses, investors, labour groups, faith leaders and local communities share our urgency. But we cannot tackle the climate crisis alone. We need science-based action from every sector of the economy, and we expect greater leadership from nation states. Young people are telling us that the climate emergency demands an emergency response. We couldn’t agree more.That is why we are supporting the Global Climate Strikes. Mayors around the world, working through C40 Cities, are committed to deliver on the Paris Agreement and taking action to peak their emissions as our cities already have and bring them down sharply by 2030. Many businesses, investors, labour groups, faith leaders and local communities share our urgency. But we cannot tackle the climate crisis alone. We need science-based action from every sector of the economy, and we expect greater leadership from nation states. Young people are telling us that the climate emergency demands an emergency response. We couldn’t agree more.
It was signed by the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, the mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio, as well as the mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti, and the lord mayor of Copenhagen, Frank Jensen.It was signed by the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, the mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio, as well as the mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti, and the lord mayor of Copenhagen, Frank Jensen.
Lovely thread by Mary Hamilton on what to do if you cannot make the strikes today but still want to make an effort to reduce your waste.Lovely thread by Mary Hamilton on what to do if you cannot make the strikes today but still want to make an effort to reduce your waste.
So for a little while I've been trying to reduce the amount of waste I produce, especially plastic, and of the various things I've tried there are two that make me happiest:1) milk delivery 2) wormerySo for a little while I've been trying to reduce the amount of waste I produce, especially plastic, and of the various things I've tried there are two that make me happiest:1) milk delivery 2) wormery
All of which is also by way of saying that if you - like me -can't #climatestrike today for whatever reason, there are other things you can do to join in. Not everyone can do worms or milk delivery obvs. Would love to hear more ideas.All of which is also by way of saying that if you - like me -can't #climatestrike today for whatever reason, there are other things you can do to join in. Not everyone can do worms or milk delivery obvs. Would love to hear more ideas.
Useful links! Find a milk delivery service in your area: https://t.co/qCl1iG1iUVComposting/wormeries: https://t.co/IMTdcZ8YBp works with some local councils, but usually easier to google [your local council] + "wormery" as each council seems to have its own schemeUseful links! Find a milk delivery service in your area: https://t.co/qCl1iG1iUVComposting/wormeries: https://t.co/IMTdcZ8YBp works with some local councils, but usually easier to google [your local council] + "wormery" as each council seems to have its own scheme
Greater Manchester mayor @AndyBurnhamGM addresses climate protest: “My generation has failed you - and I include myself in that”. Loud cheer greets his declaration that “fracking is the past - it does not belong in the future.” pic.twitter.com/QeQqrUpAE4Greater Manchester mayor @AndyBurnhamGM addresses climate protest: “My generation has failed you - and I include myself in that”. Loud cheer greets his declaration that “fracking is the past - it does not belong in the future.” pic.twitter.com/QeQqrUpAE4
Ruby, 10, and Dougie, 7, (pictured below), were the first to start striking outside the Scottish parliament, back on a cold dark 11 January. Back then it was just them and the police. Seeing how big the movement has become, Ruby says she feels “happy and proud”. “Amazing,” says Dougie.Ruby, 10, and Dougie, 7, (pictured below), were the first to start striking outside the Scottish parliament, back on a cold dark 11 January. Back then it was just them and the police. Seeing how big the movement has become, Ruby says she feels “happy and proud”. “Amazing,” says Dougie.
Staff at the Guardian will be striking today at noon, so there will be no posts on the live blog between 12:00 BST and 12:30 BST.Staff at the Guardian will be striking today at noon, so there will be no posts on the live blog between 12:00 BST and 12:30 BST.
The fashion industry is a fossil-fuel-guzzling operation, as many of our clothes are made from petroleum-based textiles such as polyester. Even natural fibres such as cotton have a huge carbon footprint and require a large portion of the world’s pesticides.The fashion industry is a fossil-fuel-guzzling operation, as many of our clothes are made from petroleum-based textiles such as polyester. Even natural fibres such as cotton have a huge carbon footprint and require a large portion of the world’s pesticides.
In a bid to solve this disastrous environmental equation, scientists and designers are creating completely new textiles from fast-growing, carbon-sucking organisms such as micro- and macro-algae, mycelium (elements of fungus), bacteria and fermented yeast. These new biotechnologies efficiently convert sunlight and CO2 into mass raw materials, suck carbon out of the atmosphere and pave the way to a carbon-negative wardrobe.In a bid to solve this disastrous environmental equation, scientists and designers are creating completely new textiles from fast-growing, carbon-sucking organisms such as micro- and macro-algae, mycelium (elements of fungus), bacteria and fermented yeast. These new biotechnologies efficiently convert sunlight and CO2 into mass raw materials, suck carbon out of the atmosphere and pave the way to a carbon-negative wardrobe.