This article is from the source 'guardian' and was first published or seen on . The next check for changes will be

You can find the current article at its original source at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/live/2019/sep/20/climate-strike-global-change-protest-sydney-melbourne-london-new-york-nyc-school-student-protest-greta-thunberg-rally-live-news-latest-updates

The article has changed 36 times. There is an RSS feed of changes available.

Version 32 Version 33
Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates
(32 minutes later)
Young activists in Brazil: Less CO2, More Vida
There were small demonstrations across Brazil on Friday. In the morning, dozens of school and university students occupied the steps of Rio de Janeiro’s state legislature in hot sun. They sang, waved placards and called for the removal of business-friendly environment minister Ricardo Salles.
Striking high school student Maria Hardman, 15, was angry over far-right president Jair Bolsonaro’s failure to protect the Amazon. “He does not value the environment,” she said. “Bolsonaro is an imbecile. He does not represent me.”
Brazilians have yet to grasp the scale of the climate emergency, said Mariana Império, 30, a masters student at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.
Thalita Alves, 20, a trainee teacher at the Federal Fluminense University, said people began waking up when fires in the Bolivian Amazon caused São Paulo skies to darken. “Brazilians who voted for Bolsonaro… faithfully believe what he says,” she said. Later another demonstration marched from the environmental agency Ibama to the city centre.
High school students formed a human mosaic reading: “Save the Amazon” in Recife and held up placards with data on Amazon fires in Salvador. Students marched in the town of Novo Friburgo and in the capital Brasília, an SOS Amazon banner was hung on the walls of the environment ministry.
In the Amazon city of Belém, hundreds gathered beside the Marajó Bay. “Coming from the Amazon, I feel it’s a duty to fight,” said Lidia Seabra, 24, studying a masters in biology at the Federal University of Pará. “We are united here to defend the Amazon,” said engineering student Devyison de Jesus, 21.
In São Paulo a few thousand blocked Paulista Avenue after cheering speeches from children like Cora Ramos, 10, who held up a placard she had made that read “there is no planet B”. “If we destroy this one, there won’t be another,” she said.
Brazilian activists were also present at marches abroad. Alessandra Munduruku, an indigenous activist from the Munduruku tribe of Pará state, made a short, powerful speech to an enormous crowd in Berlin. “My people are grateful to have good people fighting and defending the Amazon,” she said through a translator to deafening cheers.
“I saw many children, many young people, parents, old people, I thought that demonstration was very beautiful,” she told The Guardian. “I had goose-bumps.”
Mexico City protestors to AMLO: “We want a future, not hydrocarbons!”
Climate protests started early outside the National Palace in central Mexico City, where President Andrés Manuel López Obrador usually holds a daily press conference. The president – commonly called AMLO – was instead in the state of Yuctán on Friday and didn’t speak of the climate issue. But he boasted, “The fall in [Mexican] petroleum production has stopped and we’re starting to produce more petroleum. ... We’re now producing more petrol in Mexico’s refineries.”
AMLO has bet big on boosting Mexico’s petroleum output and promised to lower the price of gasoline. He’s also pushed ahead with plans to build an $8bn refinery in the state of Tabasco – even starting construction prior to completing the environmental permits. AMLO also cancelled an electricity auction, which would have allowed more renewable energy into the market, and the Federal Electricity Commission (CRE) has announced plans to instead burn more coal.
“There a campaign that renewables are cheaper and it’s a lie,” CFE director Manuel Bartlett said earlier this year.
The government’s focus on fossil fuels has put in question the country’s commitment to generate 35% of its energy with renewables by 2024, according to climate change analysts.
Marchers in Mexico City targeted AMLO, chanting, “We want a future, not hydrocarbons!”
Greta Thunberg: “Change is coming whether they like it or not.”Greta Thunberg: “Change is coming whether they like it or not.”
The crowd in Battery Park roared in anticipation of Greta Thunberg, who was introduced by Alexandria Villasenor, Thunberg’s NYC equivalent who her spends her Fridays protesting outside the UN headquarters in New York City. The crowd in Battery Park roared in anticipation of Greta Thunberg, who was introduced by Alexandria Villaseñor, Thunberg’s NYC equivalent who her spends her Fridays protesting outside the UN headquarters in New York City.
“Greta! Greta! Greta!” the crowd chanted as Thunberg got on the stage.“Greta! Greta! Greta!” the crowd chanted as Thunberg got on the stage.
The 16-year-old started her speech off by marking the number of people who participated in the strike around the world. In New York City, 250,000 people marched. Worldwide, more than 4m demonstrated.The 16-year-old started her speech off by marking the number of people who participated in the strike around the world. In New York City, 250,000 people marched. Worldwide, more than 4m demonstrated.
Thunberg’s directed her speech to the hundreds of students in the crowd, though she acknowledged that adults also skipped worked to strike.Thunberg’s directed her speech to the hundreds of students in the crowd, though she acknowledged that adults also skipped worked to strike.
“We will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse, even if it means skipping school or work, because this is more important,” Thunberg said. “Why should we study for a future that is being taken away from us? “We will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse, even if it means skipping school or work, because this is more important,” Thunberg said. “Why should we study for a future that is being taken away from us?”
Thunberg had to pause her speech twice to point out that people in the crowd needed medical attention. Many people had been in the sun all afternoon waiting for Thunberg to speak. The crowd patiently waited for Thunberg to start speaking again, each time cheering when she started speaking again. Thunberg had to pause her speech twice to point out that people in the crowd needed medical attention. Many people had been in the sun all afternoon waiting for Thunberg to speak. The crowd patiently waited for Thunberg to start speaking again, each time cheering when she continued.
The crowd laughed when Thunberg described all the politicians she met who asked for selfies and “tell us they ‘really, really admire what we do’” yet have done nothing to address the climate crisis. “We demand a safe future. Is that really to much to ask?” Thunberg elicited laughter when she described all the politicians she had met who asked for selfies and “tell us they really, really admire what we do” yet have done nothing to address the climate crisis. “We demand a safe future. Is that really to much to ask?”
“No!” The crowd shouted back. “No!” the crowd shouted back.
At the end of her speech, Thunberg emphasized that the strikes around the world are just the start of change.At the end of her speech, Thunberg emphasized that the strikes around the world are just the start of change.
“If you belong to that small group of people who feel threatened by us, we have some very bad news for you, because this is only the beginning,” Thunberg said. “Change is coming whether they like it or not.”“If you belong to that small group of people who feel threatened by us, we have some very bad news for you, because this is only the beginning,” Thunberg said. “Change is coming whether they like it or not.”
Students in the crowd said they felt moved seeing Thunberg speech in person. Students in the crowd said they felt moved seeing Thunberg speak in person.
“I started crying. I just found it powerful and empowering,” said Juliana Rubiano, 16. “She represents a lot of people, and that’s us, that’s the youth.”“I started crying. I just found it powerful and empowering,” said Juliana Rubiano, 16. “She represents a lot of people, and that’s us, that’s the youth.”
Californians are no strangers to the climate crisis fight – and now they’re taking on the federal governmentCalifornians are no strangers to the climate crisis fight – and now they’re taking on the federal government
California is not a place that requires convincing that the climate is changing. The people here don’t even need to see the science — they’re feeling the impacts firsthand, as the state teeters between an eroding coastline and growing wildland fires.California is not a place that requires convincing that the climate is changing. The people here don’t even need to see the science — they’re feeling the impacts firsthand, as the state teeters between an eroding coastline and growing wildland fires.
Perhaps because of its many vulnerabilities, California has taken arguably the strongest stance of any US state in fighting the climate crisis, at times also fighting with the federal government in the process. When the Trump administration moved to undo California’s strict vehicle emissions standards this month, the state vowed to fight. Governor Gavin Newsom hit back with, of course, a tweet: “We will prevail. See you in court.”Perhaps because of its many vulnerabilities, California has taken arguably the strongest stance of any US state in fighting the climate crisis, at times also fighting with the federal government in the process. When the Trump administration moved to undo California’s strict vehicle emissions standards this month, the state vowed to fight. Governor Gavin Newsom hit back with, of course, a tweet: “We will prevail. See you in court.”
Earlier this week, the University of California pledged to divest over $80bn in endowment and pension funds from fossil fuel companies, citing the “financial risk” posed by the industry, compared to renewable energy. Climate advocates called it the biggest single commitment by any university, and perhaps the beginning of a new divesting trend.Earlier this week, the University of California pledged to divest over $80bn in endowment and pension funds from fossil fuel companies, citing the “financial risk” posed by the industry, compared to renewable energy. Climate advocates called it the biggest single commitment by any university, and perhaps the beginning of a new divesting trend.
California cities, including Berkeley and San Jose, are leading the country with a wave of local laws to phase out natural gas hook-ups in new construction, despite strong and well-funded opposition from the gas industry. Natural gas is the greatest source of carbon emissions from buildings, while fully electrifying homes and businesses could allow them to run on clean, renewable energy instead.California cities, including Berkeley and San Jose, are leading the country with a wave of local laws to phase out natural gas hook-ups in new construction, despite strong and well-funded opposition from the gas industry. Natural gas is the greatest source of carbon emissions from buildings, while fully electrifying homes and businesses could allow them to run on clean, renewable energy instead.
California’s municipalities have also taken direct aim at the industry responsible for so much of the climate crisis. Eight cities and counties in the state have filed civil lawsuits against fossil fuel companies, alleging public nuisance and in some cases negligence. The suits seek billions of dollars in damages to help mitigate climate impacts.California’s municipalities have also taken direct aim at the industry responsible for so much of the climate crisis. Eight cities and counties in the state have filed civil lawsuits against fossil fuel companies, alleging public nuisance and in some cases negligence. The suits seek billions of dollars in damages to help mitigate climate impacts.
Maanvi Singh, here — taking up the Guardian’s live climate strike coverage from the West Coast.Maanvi Singh, here — taking up the Guardian’s live climate strike coverage from the West Coast.
Coming up, West Coast environment correspondent Susie Cagle will be sharing sketches and scenes from the demonstration in Richmond, California, across the bay from San Francisco. A Chevron refinery older than the town itself looms over it, and the area is home to some of the boldest climate-minded activism in California.Coming up, West Coast environment correspondent Susie Cagle will be sharing sketches and scenes from the demonstration in Richmond, California, across the bay from San Francisco. A Chevron refinery older than the town itself looms over it, and the area is home to some of the boldest climate-minded activism in California.
I'm heading to cover the climate strike in Richmond today. The crowd will be smaller than in SF or Berkeley, but Richmond has been home to some of the most exciting and effective environmental organizing for 15+ years now, all in the shadow of a 100-year-old Chevron refinery.I'm heading to cover the climate strike in Richmond today. The crowd will be smaller than in SF or Berkeley, but Richmond has been home to some of the most exciting and effective environmental organizing for 15+ years now, all in the shadow of a 100-year-old Chevron refinery.
Technology reporter Kari Paul will be following up on climate walkouts at Amazon, Twitter, Facebook and Google.Technology reporter Kari Paul will be following up on climate walkouts at Amazon, Twitter, Facebook and Google.
And Los Angeles correspondent Sam Levin will bring us dispatches from the protests in southern California.And Los Angeles correspondent Sam Levin will bring us dispatches from the protests in southern California.
Mexico City protests: thousands take to the streetsMexico City protests: thousands take to the streets
Thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets of Mexico City to join the global climate strike this afternoon. “Se ve, se siente, la tierra está caliente,” the crowds shouted as they processed down the city’s main avenue, Reforma towards its presidential palace. “You see it, you feel it. The earth is getting hotter.”Protesters - many of them school children and teenagers - carried homemade banners reading: “There’s no money in a dead earth” and “Action now!” One placard urged demonstrators to make love, not CO2.Thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets of Mexico City to join the global climate strike this afternoon. “Se ve, se siente, la tierra está caliente,” the crowds shouted as they processed down the city’s main avenue, Reforma towards its presidential palace. “You see it, you feel it. The earth is getting hotter.”Protesters - many of them school children and teenagers - carried homemade banners reading: “There’s no money in a dead earth” and “Action now!” One placard urged demonstrators to make love, not CO2.
There were reports of other demonstrations, big and small, across Mexico in cities including Acapulco, Irapuato, Guadalajara and Tijuana. Unlike in Brazil, where far-right president Jair Bolsonaro has ignored today’s movement, the protests received the blessing of the Mexican government which tweeted its support. In a Twitter video Victor Toledo, Mexico’s environment secretary, urged the country to reflect on the environment “insurgency” taking place around the world and to take action where possible.There were reports of other demonstrations, big and small, across Mexico in cities including Acapulco, Irapuato, Guadalajara and Tijuana. Unlike in Brazil, where far-right president Jair Bolsonaro has ignored today’s movement, the protests received the blessing of the Mexican government which tweeted its support. In a Twitter video Victor Toledo, Mexico’s environment secretary, urged the country to reflect on the environment “insurgency” taking place around the world and to take action where possible.
‘There is no Planet B’‘There is no Planet B’
Best friends Amaya Mejia, 10, and Scarlett Harrison, 11, skipped school together to join the Miami Beach youth climate strike, after staying up late the night before to craft their placards. Amaya opted for a globe with the simple message: “There is no Planet B”.Best friends Amaya Mejia, 10, and Scarlett Harrison, 11, skipped school together to join the Miami Beach youth climate strike, after staying up late the night before to craft their placards. Amaya opted for a globe with the simple message: “There is no Planet B”.
“You need to listen to us, it’s the only planet we’ve got and we need to protect it,” said Amaya, who attends the Gulliver private school in Coral Gables.“You need to listen to us, it’s the only planet we’ve got and we need to protect it,” said Amaya, who attends the Gulliver private school in Coral Gables.
Messages on banners ranged from simple and effective like Amaya’s, to the deeply political and often comical. “The government can regulate my uterus but not single-use plastics?” read one.Messages on banners ranged from simple and effective like Amaya’s, to the deeply political and often comical. “The government can regulate my uterus but not single-use plastics?” read one.
Best friends Amaya Mejia, 10, and Scarlett Harrison, 11, stayed up late last night to make their placards for the Miami Beach #schoolstrike4climate. @GuardianUS #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/4LTIFHNdEBBest friends Amaya Mejia, 10, and Scarlett Harrison, 11, stayed up late last night to make their placards for the Miami Beach #schoolstrike4climate. @GuardianUS #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/4LTIFHNdEB
Another student held aloft a sign informing the crowd: “I’m not showing up for school because adults aren’t showing up for children,” while another said: “You’ll die of old age, I’ll die of climate change.”Another student held aloft a sign informing the crowd: “I’m not showing up for school because adults aren’t showing up for children,” while another said: “You’ll die of old age, I’ll die of climate change.”
More locally-themed placards, referencing the threat of sea level rise to Miami Beach, a hugely popular tourism destination, included one that read: “Take a stand before our city is all sand.”More locally-themed placards, referencing the threat of sea level rise to Miami Beach, a hugely popular tourism destination, included one that read: “Take a stand before our city is all sand.”
My favorite, however, was perhaps the most understated message of the day. “I’m very upset,” it read.My favorite, however, was perhaps the most understated message of the day. “I’m very upset,” it read.
Covering Climate NowCovering Climate Now
Covering the climate crisis is absolutely core to the Guardian’s editorial mission.Covering the climate crisis is absolutely core to the Guardian’s editorial mission.
And all this week, we have been a lead partner in Covering Climate Now, an initiative founded earlier this year with the Columbia Journalism Review and the Nation.And all this week, we have been a lead partner in Covering Climate Now, an initiative founded earlier this year with the Columbia Journalism Review and the Nation.
This has led to more than 250 newsrooms representing 32 countries – with a combined monthly reach of more than a billion people – signing on to amplify and share content on climate change.This has led to more than 250 newsrooms representing 32 countries – with a combined monthly reach of more than a billion people – signing on to amplify and share content on climate change.
There has been a burst of coverage this week on the Guardian and beyond ahead of the UN climate summit next week on Monday 23 September.There has been a burst of coverage this week on the Guardian and beyond ahead of the UN climate summit next week on Monday 23 September.
Check out some of our pieces this week including:Check out some of our pieces this week including:
The silenced: meet the climate whistleblowers muzzled by TrumpThe silenced: meet the climate whistleblowers muzzled by Trump
The sinking class: the New Yorkers left to fight the climate crisis aloneThe sinking class: the New Yorkers left to fight the climate crisis alone
How TV weathercasters became the unsung heroes of the climate crisisHow TV weathercasters became the unsung heroes of the climate crisis
‘Like a sunburn on your lungs’: how does the climate crisis impact health?‘Like a sunburn on your lungs’: how does the climate crisis impact health?
Thousands of people are striking in Boston, MassachusettsThousands of people are striking in Boston, Massachusetts
Organizers expected some 10,000 people to rally at City Hall Plaza for the Boston Climate Strike organized by youth climate activists.Organizers expected some 10,000 people to rally at City Hall Plaza for the Boston Climate Strike organized by youth climate activists.
Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu and former Environmental Protection Agency head Gina McCarthy were among scheduled speakers, according to NBC10 Boston.Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu and former Environmental Protection Agency head Gina McCarthy were among scheduled speakers, according to NBC10 Boston.
Miami striker: ‘Does it matter if we’re under 15 feet of water or 50 feet?’Miami striker: ‘Does it matter if we’re under 15 feet of water or 50 feet?’
Dan Gelber, the mayor of Miami Beach, received a warmer reception than any politician might have expected when he emerged to address the hundreds of student climate campaigners making a racket right outside his office window.Dan Gelber, the mayor of Miami Beach, received a warmer reception than any politician might have expected when he emerged to address the hundreds of student climate campaigners making a racket right outside his office window.
Perhaps it’s the $500m dollars his city is investing over the next five years to combat the effects of sea level rise, which already leaves neighborhoods under water during higher than usual tides. Scientists predict up to a three feet sea level rise by 2050.Perhaps it’s the $500m dollars his city is investing over the next five years to combat the effects of sea level rise, which already leaves neighborhoods under water during higher than usual tides. Scientists predict up to a three feet sea level rise by 2050.
Understated sign of the day award at Miami Beach #ClimateStrike won hands down by this dude @GuardianUS #schoolstrike4climate pic.twitter.com/qj36M4o6RyUnderstated sign of the day award at Miami Beach #ClimateStrike won hands down by this dude @GuardianUS #schoolstrike4climate pic.twitter.com/qj36M4o6Ry
Gelber pointed out the strides already taken to improve things on this island city barely seven by one miles in size: an aggressive program of elevating roads and laying larger capacity drainage pipes, along with investing in modern pump equipment and technology to faster shift the rising flood waters. It’s little wonder the environmentally-conscious city’s slogan is Rising Above.Gelber pointed out the strides already taken to improve things on this island city barely seven by one miles in size: an aggressive program of elevating roads and laying larger capacity drainage pipes, along with investing in modern pump equipment and technology to faster shift the rising flood waters. It’s little wonder the environmentally-conscious city’s slogan is Rising Above.
And today the Miami Herald reported on what could become the city’s most ambitious project yet, a proposal to turn the city-owned golf course into a 115-acre wetland park, which the newspaper says is certain to test the boundaries of what the public will accept in the name of resilience.And today the Miami Herald reported on what could become the city’s most ambitious project yet, a proposal to turn the city-owned golf course into a 115-acre wetland park, which the newspaper says is certain to test the boundaries of what the public will accept in the name of resilience.
“Change is never easy,” Miami Beach commissioner Ricky Arriola said. “If we’re truly serious about dealing with climate change then everything is on the table, including the golf course. If we’re not willing to even talk about it then we’re just paying lip service.”“Change is never easy,” Miami Beach commissioner Ricky Arriola said. “If we’re truly serious about dealing with climate change then everything is on the table, including the golf course. If we’re not willing to even talk about it then we’re just paying lip service.”
Gabriella Marchesani, 17, organizer of the Miami Beach youth climate strike, praises the city’s efforts but says more needs to be done to address the causes of the climate crisis as well as dealing with its effects.Gabriella Marchesani, 17, organizer of the Miami Beach youth climate strike, praises the city’s efforts but says more needs to be done to address the causes of the climate crisis as well as dealing with its effects.
“Miami Beach has spent a lot of money on adaptation, it can be the leading city and we hope other cities in Florida will follow,” she said. “But this cannot be done slowly, and we need climate policy. Does it matter if we’re under 15 feet of water or 50 feet?”“Miami Beach has spent a lot of money on adaptation, it can be the leading city and we hope other cities in Florida will follow,” she said. “But this cannot be done slowly, and we need climate policy. Does it matter if we’re under 15 feet of water or 50 feet?”
Nurse Angel Allen and her family drove more than 100 miles from Port St Lucie to join the Miami Beach #ClimateStrike Malik, 15, says he just wants there to be a world to visit in the future #schoolstrike4climate @GuardianUS pic.twitter.com/UTKZlAqEKNNurse Angel Allen and her family drove more than 100 miles from Port St Lucie to join the Miami Beach #ClimateStrike Malik, 15, says he just wants there to be a world to visit in the future #schoolstrike4climate @GuardianUS pic.twitter.com/UTKZlAqEKN
Thousands converge on Battery Park, New YorkThousands converge on Battery Park, New York
Most New York strikers have now made it down to Battery Park where a stage has been set up close to the water. Hundreds of people are packed around the stage, Greta is slated to speak, and many more are camped out sitting on the grass in the park.Most New York strikers have now made it down to Battery Park where a stage has been set up close to the water. Hundreds of people are packed around the stage, Greta is slated to speak, and many more are camped out sitting on the grass in the park.
Battery Park is packed with people #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/Sr8tRI76TuBattery Park is packed with people #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/Sr8tRI76Tu
Young speakers took the stage giving personal testimonies of how the climate crisis is affecting them, denouncing politicians on both sides, saying just believing the facts isn’t enough without action.Young speakers took the stage giving personal testimonies of how the climate crisis is affecting them, denouncing politicians on both sides, saying just believing the facts isn’t enough without action.
When Jaden Smith took the stage, people started running the stage. In between two songs he reminded the crowd: “We gotta show people we care about this.”When Jaden Smith took the stage, people started running the stage. In between two songs he reminded the crowd: “We gotta show people we care about this.”
Climate meme powerClimate meme power
People keep stopping Lauren Drabenstott, an NYU student, for pictures of her double-sided poster. “I just felt like it’s a good way to get across the younger generation.” #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/w5vhRmvzOaPeople keep stopping Lauren Drabenstott, an NYU student, for pictures of her double-sided poster. “I just felt like it’s a good way to get across the younger generation.” #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/w5vhRmvzOa
Dorian victims convinced of link to climate changeDorian victims convinced of link to climate change
Reporting from the hurricane-hit Bahamas last week, I met David Dean, a sous chef at one of its holiday resorts. “My wife and kids had me as ‘dead’ on Facebook because they couldn’t find me,” he said. “When I called them, there was a lot of crying.”Reporting from the hurricane-hit Bahamas last week, I met David Dean, a sous chef at one of its holiday resorts. “My wife and kids had me as ‘dead’ on Facebook because they couldn’t find me,” he said. “When I called them, there was a lot of crying.”
Like many in these Caribbean islands, Dean is convinced that the climate crisis in making hurricanes such as Dorian more likely and more intense. “It was very hot,” the 38-year-old said. “That’s why the hurricane was coming to us. Heat brings the hurricane and makes it worse.”Like many in these Caribbean islands, Dean is convinced that the climate crisis in making hurricanes such as Dorian more likely and more intense. “It was very hot,” the 38-year-old said. “That’s why the hurricane was coming to us. Heat brings the hurricane and makes it worse.”
Some 52 people are confirmed dead in the Bahamas, a figure expected to rise, and more than 1,300 are still missing. The scale of destruction was astonishing, as if a giant with a child’s temperament had run amok, flipping over cars and buses like toys. As so often, the underclass suffers the most.Some 52 people are confirmed dead in the Bahamas, a figure expected to rise, and more than 1,300 are still missing. The scale of destruction was astonishing, as if a giant with a child’s temperament had run amok, flipping over cars and buses like toys. As so often, the underclass suffers the most.
The science is complex but this Guardian article explains how global heating made Dorian bigger, wetter and deadlier.The science is complex but this Guardian article explains how global heating made Dorian bigger, wetter and deadlier.
Many in the Bahamas are determined to stay the course, not least because tourism is so crucial to the economy. The owners of the hard hit Treasure Cay beach, marine and golf resort declared their intention to rebuild. But some residents also expressed concern that such efforts could be undone by the next hurricane, and the one after that.Many in the Bahamas are determined to stay the course, not least because tourism is so crucial to the economy. The owners of the hard hit Treasure Cay beach, marine and golf resort declared their intention to rebuild. But some residents also expressed concern that such efforts could be undone by the next hurricane, and the one after that.
For now the Bahamas is dealing with scars, mental and physical. Dean told me: “Now, if I feel a little rain, it might be drive me crazy. I’m traumatised. I don’t ever want to go through that again.”For now the Bahamas is dealing with scars, mental and physical. Dean told me: “Now, if I feel a little rain, it might be drive me crazy. I’m traumatised. I don’t ever want to go through that again.”
'The poor are punished': Dorian lays bare inequality in the Bahamas'The poor are punished': Dorian lays bare inequality in the Bahamas
This video is great at capturing some of the scale of the New York action.This video is great at capturing some of the scale of the New York action.
NYCs massive #ClimateStrike march has begun, from Foley Sq down Centre St to Chambers St across to Broadway... and down to the Battery! Thank you @ClimateCrisis and everyone else marching! pic.twitter.com/WUpeRP0ZQSNYCs massive #ClimateStrike march has begun, from Foley Sq down Centre St to Chambers St across to Broadway... and down to the Battery! Thank you @ClimateCrisis and everyone else marching! pic.twitter.com/WUpeRP0ZQS
Which countries contribute most to the climate crisis? How much is the US to blame?Which countries contribute most to the climate crisis? How much is the US to blame?
China produces the most heat-trapping pollution, followed by the US, the European Union, India and Russia. But historically, the US has contributed more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than any other nation.China produces the most heat-trapping pollution, followed by the US, the European Union, India and Russia. But historically, the US has contributed more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than any other nation.
The US also has high emissions per capita, compared to other developed countries. And Americans buy products made in China, therefore supporting China’s carbon footprint.The US also has high emissions per capita, compared to other developed countries. And Americans buy products made in China, therefore supporting China’s carbon footprint.
What has happened to the US Environmental Protection Agency with climate change?What has happened to the US Environmental Protection Agency with climate change?
The EPA has begun efforts to eliminate climate rules for power plants, cars and the methane leaked from oil and gas facilities.The EPA has begun efforts to eliminate climate rules for power plants, cars and the methane leaked from oil and gas facilities.
Has the US already pulled out of the Paris accord? What if Democrats win next election?Has the US already pulled out of the Paris accord? What if Democrats win next election?
The US has not yet exited the international accord, in which every other nation on earth agreed to voluntarily begin to curb emissions. The deal was meant to prevent global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above preindustrial levels.The US has not yet exited the international accord, in which every other nation on earth agreed to voluntarily begin to curb emissions. The deal was meant to prevent global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above preindustrial levels.
Technically, the US cannot leave the agreement until the day after the November 2020 election, when Trump will still be president regardless of the outcome.Technically, the US cannot leave the agreement until the day after the November 2020 election, when Trump will still be president regardless of the outcome.
A Democrat president could rejoin the deal.A Democrat president could rejoin the deal.
Is Donald Trump making climate change worse with his rollbacks?Is Donald Trump making climate change worse with his rollbacks?
The US is falling far short of its commitments to curb heat-trapping pollution, in part because Trump has gutted efforts made by his predecessor, Barack Obama.The US is falling far short of its commitments to curb heat-trapping pollution, in part because Trump has gutted efforts made by his predecessor, Barack Obama.
The country is on track to cut emissions 13% to 16% below 2005 levels by 2020, according to the analysis firm Rhodium Group. That’s short of the 17% reduction the US promised in the Copenhagen Accord. “Looking ahead to 2025, the US is on track to achieve reductions anywhere from 12% to 19% below 2005 levels absent major policy changes—a far cry from its Paris Agreement pledge to reduce emissions 26% to 28%,” Rhodium Group explains.The country is on track to cut emissions 13% to 16% below 2005 levels by 2020, according to the analysis firm Rhodium Group. That’s short of the 17% reduction the US promised in the Copenhagen Accord. “Looking ahead to 2025, the US is on track to achieve reductions anywhere from 12% to 19% below 2005 levels absent major policy changes—a far cry from its Paris Agreement pledge to reduce emissions 26% to 28%,” Rhodium Group explains.
The US, however, represents 15% of world emissions.The US, however, represents 15% of world emissions.
Is Donald Trump a climate change denier? What is his record?Is Donald Trump a climate change denier? What is his record?
Before becoming president, Trump called climate change a Chinese hoax. In an interview with Piers Morgan, he deflected questions about how his policies promote continued climate-change causing emissions. He said the US has “the cleanest climates” and “China, India, Russia, many other nations, they have not very good air, not very good water.”Before becoming president, Trump called climate change a Chinese hoax. In an interview with Piers Morgan, he deflected questions about how his policies promote continued climate-change causing emissions. He said the US has “the cleanest climates” and “China, India, Russia, many other nations, they have not very good air, not very good water.”
Trump’s White House has downplayed the dangers of the climate crisis, including disagreeing with a federal report showing it threatens the US economy. Many of the president’s appointees have denied climate change, and government scientists say their work on the crisis has been silenced.Trump’s White House has downplayed the dangers of the climate crisis, including disagreeing with a federal report showing it threatens the US economy. Many of the president’s appointees have denied climate change, and government scientists say their work on the crisis has been silenced.