This article is from the source 'guardian' and was first published or seen on . The next check for changes will be

You can find the current article at its original source at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/live/2019/sep/20/climate-strike-global-change-protest-sydney-melbourne-london-new-york-nyc-school-student-protest-greta-thunberg-rally-live-news-latest-updates

The article has changed 36 times. There is an RSS feed of changes available.

Version 3 Version 4
Climate strike: global climate change protest kicks off in Australia and Pacific – live updates Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate change protest – live updates
(about 2 hours later)
Continuing our series EnergyAustralia have agreed to field a question from a climate striker. Along with Queensland’s Stanwell Corporation, they were the other one of Australia’s top 10 carbon emitters to agree. They’re marching in the Philippines too
Josh O’Callaghan, 15 from Adelaide asks: HAPPENING NOW: March to J. Diokno Park, CHR, UP Diliman Complex pic.twitter.com/dqr1imYJcY
What are the future initiatives that your company plans to put in place to have 100% renewable energy production? We have reached the Commission on Human Rights! Join us here. #ClimateStrike #ClimateStrikePH #ParaSaKlimabukasan pic.twitter.com/EkygPYxBd2
Mark Collette, the head of EnergyAustralia’s customer business answers: Amazing #CoffsHarbour #ClimateStrike over 1400 people TRIPLE the March 15 #Schoolstrike4climate huge energy marching on Gumbaynggirr land for our kids future #ClimateJustice pic.twitter.com/Ffj17LgrGB
Thanks Josh. Designing and building a 100% renewable energy system is a huge change for Australia. I think Australians are up for the challenge. Your home state of South Australia has solar and wind already providing over half of the electricity supplied to South Australians. Justin McCurry in Japan writes:
In planning for 100% renewables, the first 50% is easier than the second 50%. Solar and wind generation follow the sun and the wind, so when it is not sunny and windy, we can’t produce power for customers. Japan has suffered unseasonable, powerful and fatal storms in recent years that have also inflicted serious damage on its infrastructure. Last week’s typhoon was unusually strong, leaving hundreds of thousands of people without power. The country has also been hit by record-breaking heatwaves one last summer killed 65 people in a single week.
I reckon that above about 50% renewables for Australia, we need to find ways to move the power from the sun and the wind to dark and still times, or use it immediately. Japan’s government had planned to expand nuclear power in an effort to tackle carbon dioxide emissions, but the Fukushima disaster changed all that. Pressure is building to invest more in renewables as the government expands coal-fired power stations and imports of gas and oil to fill the energy gap left by the post-Fukushima closure of dozens of nuclear reactors.
One way we do this is storage. Already we have two of the largest batteries in the country in Victoria, and we are working on two large pumped hydro projects one of which is in your state of South Australia. Japan’s involvement in the climate strike has been low key. This Friday adults and children belonging to the Fridays for Future Tokyo movement will gather outside the United Nations University in central Tokyo at 5pm, make speeches and then march through the streets of the capital. Just over 100 people turned up in March; students at Japanese state schools were noticeably absent and I think that will be the case this Friday.
Another way we are exploring is helping customers use power when it is available from the sun and the wind. We can time pool pumps and hot water systems to run just through these times. A few protests have begun in Japan, and one is scheduled for Tokyo at 5pm local time.
There’s a long way to go but we like tackling tough problems, like the second 50%. It’s Friday morning in Japan. Climate strike in Hiroshima just started! Please follow us! @gretathunberg #fridayforfuture #climatestrike #globalstrikeforfuture #fridayforfuture #Hiroshima #prayformotherearth #strikewithus #気候マーチ #グローバルマーチ pic.twitter.com/nvMoL0bEeT
In Sydney Daisy, 17, tells the crowd their frustration has never been about people working in the fossil-fuel industry. Their demand is “about acting to halt this crisis while creating safe and meaningful work for all of us”. I cannot stress enough that my favourite thing from today is students on the ground interviewing their fellow strikers.
INCREDIBLE pic.twitter.com/BBFoYUd76o Here is Oscar Lander-McBride, 10, interviewing Zac, 13.
And let’s not forget the regions. Oscar interviews Zac who is losing his voice after leading the crowds in chants at the Brisbane #ClimateStrike. “It’s so great, chanting with all the other people for what we think is right”. pic.twitter.com/79pa58MUPH
More photos from Lismore from Frewoini Baume: And from earlier, Esther Plummer, 13, interviewing Jasper, 15.
And these beautiful pictures from Katherine in the NT:
And here’s Albury:
Good turn out for #ClimateStrike in #Albury pic.twitter.com/lEhazJ4Ofw
The crowd in Sydney is getting so big you can really only see it from the air.
From a different angle. pic.twitter.com/onk7kVfqyH
Perth and Canberra aren’t too shabby either:
Perth climate strike #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/aZO7SmBaZn
Amazing to join colleagues and friends at #schoolstrike4climate in #Canberra today - proud of a community standing for a safe climate future @EnergyEstate pic.twitter.com/bHd4PIvj3i
This is the third nationwide climate strike in Australia – after November 2018 and March 2019. They get bigger every time.
Organisers say there are some 22,000 people at Hobart’s global climate rally - they say this is the biggest strike action Tasmania has ever seen @abchobart pic.twitter.com/CUGpg85V46
Amelia Neylon, 16, is on the ground and tells Guadian AUutralia:
The crowd is reportedly over 22,000. Bob Brown at this count has said it is larger then the Franklin River rally. Making this the largest rally in Tasmania held to date.
It’s all happening.
Brisbane. #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/KrJzLNtzfA
Lots of babies at this protest. They don’t even have jobs! #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/q3J3MwFYPz
Big turnout at Gosford #ClimateStrike (pic via my dad) pic.twitter.com/06ekkdErkR
The largest street protest in Hobart since the FRANKLIN River - 22,000 people demanding Climate Action Now #politas #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/xqjSlwN7Ci
Another must-watch, exclusive to Guardian Australia:
Harriet O'Shea Carre is one of the original school strikers from Castlemaine. She is in New York for the UN Climate Summit. Harriet is also seeking a meeting with @AIGinsurance to voice her concern over their involvement with the Adani coal mine. #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/VSnPKCcwKs
Meanwhile Australia’s strikes are making waves around the world:
Incredible pictures as Australia’s gathering for the #climatestrike This is the huge crowd building up in Sydney. Australia is setting the standard! Its bedtime in New York...so please share as many pictures as you can as the strikes move across Asia to Europe and Africa! pic.twitter.com/7eAPUQPq5C
If you are Gen X or above, then you can laugh at the latest from First Dog on the Moon instead*:
*This is a joke – First Dog is funny for all ages.
I’m a millennial / Gen Z so I understand these signs. If you don’t, rest assured they are very funny.
pic.twitter.com/adDN1uioJb
In Brisbane, here’s Parker with his message to the government – and a great poem.
How cool is Parker #climatestrike pic.twitter.com/1OqOAOMqTs
The award for best sign is getting more competitive every minute. Here is Matilda (3).
Sydney’s strikes have started but aren’t even at full swing, Melbourne’s starts in 1.5 hours, and preparations have begun in Perth.
Earlier today we saw huge turnouts in regional areas, including Alice Springs and Byron Bay.
Protesters have already started gathering in #Perth for today’s #ClimateStrike !!! pic.twitter.com/8bOlPSI31B
Angus Taylor has also agreed to take a question.
From Josh O’Callaghan, 15, from Adelaide:
It is said that ‘if those who believe in climate change are wrong, we will have needlessly created a cleaner world, but if those who don’t believe in climate change are wrong, we will die’. Do you agree? If so, how should we act on this?
Angus Taylor :
The federal government is taking strong action to reduce global emissions and respond to the serious challenge of climate change.
The government’s $3.5bn climate solutions package sets out how we will meet our 2030 Paris target, down to the last tonne.
People are free to have their views, but my personal opinion is that students should be at school during school hours.”
Reporter Helen Davidson is on the ground in Sydney:
Clover Moore on the way to the Sydney #climatestrike “it’s so inspiring to see so many people heading towards the domain.” pic.twitter.com/LVifb0FG0z
Rose from Glenmore Rd Paddington public school #climatestrike “the government has to stop doing nothing about climate change” pic.twitter.com/DeJctJAjd1
Our first dispatches from Amelia Neylon in Hobart:
Photos and great signs from the Hobart #climatestrike from Amelia Neylon (16) pic.twitter.com/l4Q2c5DMmC
Meanwhile crowds build in Sydney. There is a LONG line to get in.
My son is in the Domain for the #ClimateStrike today. Here’s his first video pic.twitter.com/PhEPD61lG2
Esther in Byron Bay has interviewed her fellow strikers. Must-watch.
Esther Plummer (13 years old) interviews fellow climate strikerJasper (15 years old) about why he is attending the #ClimateStrike in Byron Bay. pic.twitter.com/YTrFpOJrC3Esther Plummer (13 years old) interviews fellow climate strikerJasper (15 years old) about why he is attending the #ClimateStrike in Byron Bay. pic.twitter.com/YTrFpOJrC3
There are more than 100,000 people in Melbourne, according to organisers.
Melbourne 2:30pm #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/Av7WW09Yxj
Ahead of today's #ClimateStrike, The Guardian asked some primary school kids what they think climate change is. pic.twitter.com/IY2QuwVVAb
Video of the crowds at the Brisbane #ClimateStrike thanks to our reporter on the ground @BenSmee pic.twitter.com/ciVfFF6GWV
An aerial view of Melbourne, only 30 minutes in.
#climatestrike just starting to build in #Melbourne, I'm sure we will see this build and build over the next hour. pic.twitter.com/lcjACJKRke
And here’s the march crossing Brisbane’s Victoria bridge:
Here they come. #ClimateStrike protesters making their way over the Victoria Bridge in Brisbane @abcnews @abcbrisbane pic.twitter.com/niGut3inN3
In Bali:
In Singapore:
And in Brisbane who better to give a crowd estimate than Haemish Lander-McBride, 13, who has been to the past two strikes.
“It’s massive in comparison to the other ones ... People aren’t just going to the first one – people are really coming again and again and again.”
"It’s not something we’re gonna give up on" says 13-year-old Haemish Lander-McBride at the Brisbane #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/rsdzuew0WW
And big crowds in Adelaide:
This is huge #ClimateStrike #Adelaide pic.twitter.com/TLJWS3ZRqY
Incredible turnout in Adelaide for #ClimateStrike reminder: we’ve only got one shot. pic.twitter.com/w0NBUjZW5j
An estimated 10,000 in Perth:
Absolutely incredible crowd of at least 10,000 people here in Perth for the #GlobalClimateStrike I’m blown away! #schoolstrike4climate pic.twitter.com/VWq6BHRaDm