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Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates
(32 minutes later)
Nearly two-thirds (64%) of Generation Z Americans want to work for employers committed to tackling climate change, according to research released today from international non-profit, the Climate Group. The US is waking up (in more ways than one) and already there are sizeable crowds reported.
It surveyed more than 1,000 16 to 24-year-olds across the US to find out their views on climate change and how it will affect their future choices. Huge crowd on #ClimateStrike in DC chanting “This is what democracy looks like!”#strikewithus #greennewdeal #fridaysforfuture pic.twitter.com/BH16qNiWrQ
Three in four young people (77%) felt that climate change is an important issue that needs to be solved, with almost identical results for Democratic and Republican states (80% vs 76%). There is a large crowd at the Old Capitol for the #ClimateStrike in #Tallahassee. pic.twitter.com/CBC9h2sder
With the US federal government actively rolling back pro climate policies, for most young people, the bulk of responsibility to solve the climate crisis rests on the shoulders of big US businesses and state governments alike (60% for big businesses vs 69% for state governments). #ClimateStrike at University of New Hampshire. Proud to see my students (undergrad and grad) here. Wildcats fight for the future! pic.twitter.com/aUb7syZsX4
Four out of five (80%) support U.S. companies adopting renewable energy in place of fossil fuels, with two in five (40%) believing they should be using 100% clean energy already Two fifths think the switch needs to be made by 2030 at the latest. We’re here at Brooklyn Borough Hall rallying with local students for the #ClimateStrike, and we’re fired up! pic.twitter.com/hA5BGqATg8
Within the transport sector, two-thirds (66%) of young people would support short haul flights being replaced with cleaner alternatives, such as high-speed rail, Here is a useful reminder about the impact of flying. You can also calculate the impact of your next trip.
How your flight emits as much CO2 as many people do in a year
Anuna De Wever, 18, a cofounder of Belgium’s school strike movement, which has organised 20 nationwide strike days since January, said today’s protest in Brussels made her feel hopeful.
It was amazing, we had 20,000 across the streets. I am really happy about this strike because I feel like after coming on the streets after 20 weeks, this is our season two. There are so many people ready and it just makes me feel very hopeful.
But she added:
Belgium is doing really badly on the climate crisis. There is not any ambition from any of our politicians. So we are really asking them to take responsibility because right now we don’t have a climate policy and they really need to take responsibility.
While Belgium has signed the Paris Agreement, the three Belgian regions (Flanders, Brussels and Wallonia) have so far been unable to agree on the distribution of emissions cuts.
De Wever thinks the school strike movement is helping to bridge these old political divides.
There are some arguments, especially in politics but we don’t care about that and we want to unite everyone to fight with us. I think it’s beautiful that no one is thinking about this, are they from the Walloon side or are they from the Flemish side.
The Brussels protest finished close to the headquarters of the European commission and European council - not an accidental choice as the EU debates decarbonising its economy by 2050.
Earlier in the day, De Wever and other activists met the European commission vice president, Frans Timmermans, who has been tasked with drawing up a Green New Deal to allow the EU to move away from fossil fuel and meet its climate pledges.
The bulk of those still taking part in the climate strike in London reached the entrance to Trafalgar Square a littler earlier, where police blocked it off at Northumberland Avenue to chants of “let them through.” Many people are on their way home now.
I was speaking at the back of the crowd to two new mothers, Chloe Reeves and Lauren Slattery, who had brought along their children, Leo (five months) and Phoenix (seven months).
While deeply concerned about the climate crisis – to the extent that they have discussed jointly purchasing land on higher ground for children as reaction to rising sea levels - they’ve been drawing some encouragement from the international focus of the strikes.
“To be honest as a new mother I’ve been putting all my energy into the basic job of keeping baby alive and looking after him and I’ve purposefully not thought about climate change because it has freaked my out so much, but now my mother instincts have allowed me to shift a bit of emphasis on to things like this and the action that we need to take,” said Chloe.
Lauren added: “Actions like today have really been inspiring. We recycle and do as much as we can in our personal daily lives but you really realise that so much more needs to done, and we really are on a tight schedule.”
Meanwhile, two of the youngest participants in the London #ClimateStrike - Phoenix (7mnths) & Leo (5mnths)(They’ve brought along their mums Lauren and Cloe) pic.twitter.com/fGY3fd4vra
Nearly two-thirds (64%) of Generation Z Americans want to work for employers committed to tackling climate change, according to research released today from international non-profit organisation the Climate Group.
It surveyed more than 1,000 16- to 24-year-olds across the US to find out their views on climate change and how it will affect their future choices. Three in four young people (77%) feel climate change is an important issue that needs to be solved, with almost identical results for Democratic and Republican states (80% v 76%).
With the US federal government actively rolling back pro-climate policies, for most young people the bulk of responsibility to solve the climate crisis rests on the shoulders of big US businesses and state governments alike (60% for big businesses v 69% for state governments).
Four out of five (80%) support US companies adopting renewable energy in place of fossil fuels, with two in five (40%) believing they should be using 100% clean energy already. Two-fifths think the switch needs to be made by 2030 at the latest.
Within the transport sector, two-thirds (66%) of young people would support the replacement of short-haul flights with cleaner alternatives, such as high-speed rail.
Helen Clarkson, CEO of the Climate Group, which annually hosts Climate Week NYC, said:Helen Clarkson, CEO of the Climate Group, which annually hosts Climate Week NYC, said:
We need wholescale changes to economies and infrastructure to make pro climate choices the new normal. It is in the interests of every business and government to sit up and listen to the next generation of workers and voters. We need wholescale changes to economies and infrastructure to make pro-climate choices the new normal. It is in the interests of every business and government to sit up and listen to the next generation of workers and voters.
We know through our initiatives for business on renewables, electric vehicles, and smart efficient energy and work with state and regional governments that good progress is being made in the U.S., but more needs to be done at a greater pace and scale. We know through our initiatives for business on renewables, electric vehicles, and smart efficient energy and work with state and regional governments that good progress is being made in the US, but more needs to be done at a greater pace and scale.
Demonstrations, marches, even open-air classes on environmental policy are planned in more than 40 Brazilian cities on Friday. And while numbers are likely to range widely – from 186 people who signed up for the Facebook event of a protest at 5pm in the southern city of Florianópolis to 12,000 promising to attend another at 4pm on São Paulo’s landmark Paulista Avenue, activists said the geographical spread of cities taking part shows how non-party, environmental activism is growing here.Demonstrations, marches, even open-air classes on environmental policy are planned in more than 40 Brazilian cities on Friday. And while numbers are likely to range widely – from 186 people who signed up for the Facebook event of a protest at 5pm in the southern city of Florianópolis to 12,000 promising to attend another at 4pm on São Paulo’s landmark Paulista Avenue, activists said the geographical spread of cities taking part shows how non-party, environmental activism is growing here.
“We are talking to churches, unions, social movements,” said Yumi Kawamura, 45, a sociologist helping organise the São Paulo event, “looking to unite organisations with different agendas and find a common way forward.”“We are talking to churches, unions, social movements,” said Yumi Kawamura, 45, a sociologist helping organise the São Paulo event, “looking to unite organisations with different agendas and find a common way forward.”
In Rio de Janeiro, a protest at 10am outside the state legislature is aimed at children and young people. Another is scheduled for 2.30pm. Then at 4pm demonstrators hold an open-air class outside the headquarters of beleaguered environment agency Ibama - under attack from far-right president Jair Bolsonaro and his business-friendly environment minister, Ricardo Salles – before marching to the city centre.In Rio de Janeiro, a protest at 10am outside the state legislature is aimed at children and young people. Another is scheduled for 2.30pm. Then at 4pm demonstrators hold an open-air class outside the headquarters of beleaguered environment agency Ibama - under attack from far-right president Jair Bolsonaro and his business-friendly environment minister, Ricardo Salles – before marching to the city centre.
Events are being staged by the Rio Climate Coalition (Coalizão Pelo Clima Rio), an umbrella group of collectives. “It is very plural, it is horizontal, it is collective. It is aligned with the movement that Greta (Thunberg) started in Europe,” said Hanna Cordeiro, 31, an advertising executive and climate activist from the coalition.Events are being staged by the Rio Climate Coalition (Coalizão Pelo Clima Rio), an umbrella group of collectives. “It is very plural, it is horizontal, it is collective. It is aligned with the movement that Greta (Thunberg) started in Europe,” said Hanna Cordeiro, 31, an advertising executive and climate activist from the coalition.
Brazil is one of the world’s deadliest countries for environmental defenders – one reason, Cordeiro said, why environmental demonstrations in Brazil are usually smaller here. Another is that pressing problems with poverty, crime, unemployment and a lack of basic sanitation obscure environmental issues for many Brazilians.Brazil is one of the world’s deadliest countries for environmental defenders – one reason, Cordeiro said, why environmental demonstrations in Brazil are usually smaller here. Another is that pressing problems with poverty, crime, unemployment and a lack of basic sanitation obscure environmental issues for many Brazilians.
“In Brazil it is jobs and housing. The environmental agenda is seen as more subjective. In Europe it is much stronger,” said José Oeiras, 57, a climate organiser for the leftist Workers’ party helping stage a demonstration at 4pm in the Amazon city of Belém.“In Brazil it is jobs and housing. The environmental agenda is seen as more subjective. In Europe it is much stronger,” said José Oeiras, 57, a climate organiser for the leftist Workers’ party helping stage a demonstration at 4pm in the Amazon city of Belém.
When the Amazon fires crisis exploded, Bolsonaro’s supporters flooded social media and WhatsApp with fake news – a report by the Publica journalism agency showed how automated Twitter accounts led attacks. The propaganda deluge echoed Bolsonaro’s unproven arguments that the blazes were started by foreign NGOs and foreign interest constituted an attack on Brazilian sovereignty.When the Amazon fires crisis exploded, Bolsonaro’s supporters flooded social media and WhatsApp with fake news – a report by the Publica journalism agency showed how automated Twitter accounts led attacks. The propaganda deluge echoed Bolsonaro’s unproven arguments that the blazes were started by foreign NGOs and foreign interest constituted an attack on Brazilian sovereignty.
Such nationalist rhetoric has long resounded in the Amazon. “This is an old argument,” Oeiras said. “It’s a contradiction we need to overcome.”Such nationalist rhetoric has long resounded in the Amazon. “This is an old argument,” Oeiras said. “It’s a contradiction we need to overcome.”
Fatima Zara Alarakha, 20, a campaigner for Islamic Relief UK and an arts student, marching on Millbank beside the Houses of Parliament in central London, said fighting climate change was imperative, given her beliefs:Fatima Zara Alarakha, 20, a campaigner for Islamic Relief UK and an arts student, marching on Millbank beside the Houses of Parliament in central London, said fighting climate change was imperative, given her beliefs:
I’m here today because it is my duty as Muslim and a human. Allah entrusted us to look after the earth and it is our responsibility to do so.I’m here today because it is my duty as Muslim and a human. Allah entrusted us to look after the earth and it is our responsibility to do so.
I’m striking today to represent my family in Pakistan whose houses are being flooded as a result of our overconsumption in the west. I’m also here to represent the future generations whose lives will be affected by the decisions we make. I want to bring children up in a world where they don’t have to suffer from majorly polluted air, decrepit housing and the health problems and poverty brought on by the climate crisis.I’m striking today to represent my family in Pakistan whose houses are being flooded as a result of our overconsumption in the west. I’m also here to represent the future generations whose lives will be affected by the decisions we make. I want to bring children up in a world where they don’t have to suffer from majorly polluted air, decrepit housing and the health problems and poverty brought on by the climate crisis.
Manisha Jeevan, 16, isn’t sure she is ready for her music exam tomorrow. But she decided to skip school because climate change is more important, she says. “If there is no earth then how will we live?”Manisha Jeevan, 16, isn’t sure she is ready for her music exam tomorrow. But she decided to skip school because climate change is more important, she says. “If there is no earth then how will we live?”
She is protesting near Lodhi gardens, Delhi, with her friend, Kushi, also 16. They worry about pollution in Delhi, about the failure to manage waste properly and about the increasingly hot weather. “It’s September. Our parents used to get winter in this month but we have not got winter. We are losing our seasons,” says Kushi.She is protesting near Lodhi gardens, Delhi, with her friend, Kushi, also 16. They worry about pollution in Delhi, about the failure to manage waste properly and about the increasingly hot weather. “It’s September. Our parents used to get winter in this month but we have not got winter. We are losing our seasons,” says Kushi.
“It’s September. Our parents used to get winter in this month but we have not got winter. We are losing our seasons,” says Kushi, 16, who is protesting with her friend Manisha in Delhi #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/UywZlK5btW“It’s September. Our parents used to get winter in this month but we have not got winter. We are losing our seasons,” says Kushi, 16, who is protesting with her friend Manisha in Delhi #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/UywZlK5btW
Rishika Singh, 18, a college student, worries about the damage that Delhi’s pollution is doing to her lungs. She says:Rishika Singh, 18, a college student, worries about the damage that Delhi’s pollution is doing to her lungs. She says:
I even bought a mask, but it’s not so easy to wear every day. The pollution that we see here, and the water here which has a lot of chlorine in it - it’s not good. It’s the poorest who suffer the most.The rich are better off - they make the use of air conditioning and private cars for comfort.I even bought a mask, but it’s not so easy to wear every day. The pollution that we see here, and the water here which has a lot of chlorine in it - it’s not good. It’s the poorest who suffer the most.The rich are better off - they make the use of air conditioning and private cars for comfort.
It’s evening now in Delhi and, after an afternoon of chanting and banging drums, protesters have gone home. Nimrat Singh, 21, a law student, says people want action, not words, from their leaders. “We want the system to actually recognise climate change,” she says.It’s evening now in Delhi and, after an afternoon of chanting and banging drums, protesters have gone home. Nimrat Singh, 21, a law student, says people want action, not words, from their leaders. “We want the system to actually recognise climate change,” she says.
New York City is anticipated to see one of the largest climate strikes today. Thousands of people are expected at the protest, which is being co-hosted by over two dozen local and national groups. Protesters plan to gather at a park outside New York’s City Hall and march a mile down to Battery Park, where Greta Thunberg is scheduled to speak in the afternoon along with other performers and speakers.New York City is anticipated to see one of the largest climate strikes today. Thousands of people are expected at the protest, which is being co-hosted by over two dozen local and national groups. Protesters plan to gather at a park outside New York’s City Hall and march a mile down to Battery Park, where Greta Thunberg is scheduled to speak in the afternoon along with other performers and speakers.
In anticipation of the strikes, NYC’s Department of Education announced the absences of students in the district, the largest school district in the nation, will be excused on Friday with parental permission. In other words, 1.1 million students have been given the green light to attend the strikes if they want to. Many students have spent the last few weeks painting signs and banners in preparation.In anticipation of the strikes, NYC’s Department of Education announced the absences of students in the district, the largest school district in the nation, will be excused on Friday with parental permission. In other words, 1.1 million students have been given the green light to attend the strikes if they want to. Many students have spent the last few weeks painting signs and banners in preparation.
Before the march’s official start at noon local time (5pm BST), a rally honoring the two-year anniversary of Hurricane Maria will take place in downtown Manhattan.Before the march’s official start at noon local time (5pm BST), a rally honoring the two-year anniversary of Hurricane Maria will take place in downtown Manhattan.
The central London rally, outside parliament, has heard speeches from Jeremy Corbyn and Caroline Lucas, with the Labour leader calling for tougher global environmental standards to prevent the import of products made overseas using harmful processes.The central London rally, outside parliament, has heard speeches from Jeremy Corbyn and Caroline Lucas, with the Labour leader calling for tougher global environmental standards to prevent the import of products made overseas using harmful processes.
From an open-top double-decker bus being used a stage, Corbyn told the crowd:From an open-top double-decker bus being used a stage, Corbyn told the crowd:
So when we measure the effects of climate change emissions, let’s measure those emissions at the source, where they are created, and not put ourselves in some comfort zone, that we’re doing OK at the expense of somebody else.So when we measure the effects of climate change emissions, let’s measure those emissions at the source, where they are created, and not put ourselves in some comfort zone, that we’re doing OK at the expense of somebody else.
Corbyn also called for what Labour term a “green industrial revolution” – a version of the green new deal – to invest heavily in areas such as sustainable energy.Corbyn also called for what Labour term a “green industrial revolution” – a version of the green new deal – to invest heavily in areas such as sustainable energy.
That green industrial revolution can bring about, I believe, 400,000 decent, high-quality jobs. And with that we also have cleaner air, we have better quality of life, and we deal with many of the health inequalities that exist in this country.That green industrial revolution can bring about, I believe, 400,000 decent, high-quality jobs. And with that we also have cleaner air, we have better quality of life, and we deal with many of the health inequalities that exist in this country.
Beforehand, Lucas began by noting that in May parliament had passed a motion declaring a climate emergency. “So don’t ever let anyone tell you that you are not making a difference,” the Green MP told the crowd. “You are making history.”Beforehand, Lucas began by noting that in May parliament had passed a motion declaring a climate emergency. “So don’t ever let anyone tell you that you are not making a difference,” the Green MP told the crowd. “You are making history.”
Calling it “the biggest social justice issue of our time”, Lucas said the government needed to make more urgent plans than the commitment of net zero carbon emissions by 2050.Calling it “the biggest social justice issue of our time”, Lucas said the government needed to make more urgent plans than the commitment of net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
She said:She said:
The truth is that a climate target of net zero by 2050 is not climate leadership. When your house is on fire you don’t call 999 and ask for a fire engine in 30 years’ time. You want urgent action now.The truth is that a climate target of net zero by 2050 is not climate leadership. When your house is on fire you don’t call 999 and ask for a fire engine in 30 years’ time. You want urgent action now.
This is a striking picture, no pun intended, from Berlin.This is a striking picture, no pun intended, from Berlin.
The translation of the sign held by “Merkel” reads: “Mother (Merkel) has failed, now it’s the turn of young people.”The translation of the sign held by “Merkel” reads: “Mother (Merkel) has failed, now it’s the turn of young people.”
The Bishop of Wolverhampton, Clive Gregory, has asked all clergy members and lay employees within the Dioceses of Lichfield to set aside their usual duties today to focus instead on Climate Action activities.The Bishop of Wolverhampton, Clive Gregory, has asked all clergy members and lay employees within the Dioceses of Lichfield to set aside their usual duties today to focus instead on Climate Action activities.
Gregory led a special service at Lichfield Cathedral to raise awareness about the climate crisis. Around 550 pupils and teachers from five West Midlands primary schools attended.Gregory led a special service at Lichfield Cathedral to raise awareness about the climate crisis. Around 550 pupils and teachers from five West Midlands primary schools attended.
Children from St Michael’s CE primary school in Lichfield arrived holding handmade signs and chanting “save our world”.Children from St Michael’s CE primary school in Lichfield arrived holding handmade signs and chanting “save our world”.
My colleague, Ben Quinn, is in Westminster where climate strikers are heading towards Downing Street, but there is also a counter-demonstration by Jeremy Corbyn’s brother, and famed climate change denier, Piers.My colleague, Ben Quinn, is in Westminster where climate strikers are heading towards Downing Street, but there is also a counter-demonstration by Jeremy Corbyn’s brother, and famed climate change denier, Piers.
In London #ClimateStrike crowd is moving in direction of N10.. cheers as thin yellow line of police move off in front pic.twitter.com/rLuKjAnhuuIn London #ClimateStrike crowd is moving in direction of N10.. cheers as thin yellow line of police move off in front pic.twitter.com/rLuKjAnhuu
Piers Corbyn on a megaphone leading a small group of people in Westminster against the #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/FjJvg3KpPiPiers Corbyn on a megaphone leading a small group of people in Westminster against the #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/FjJvg3KpPi
The German government today announced a new climate protection package costing €50bn, which was immediately criticised as lacking ambition by Fridays for Future protesters.At a press conference in central Berlin, the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, said that as a scientist she had been impressed by Greta Thunberg’s motto “unite behind the science”.Following a marathon negotiation session, Merkel’s conservatives and her Social Democrat coalition partner detailed plans for increased purchase premiers for electric cars, and new taxes for traditional cars with emissions over 115mg. The measures include a ban on installing oil-fired heating in buildings from 2025, with a subsidy for householders prepared to switch to more climate-friendly alternatives.A price for emissions of carbon dioxide has also been agreed that will take effect via trading in emissions certificates. The package also includes new investment in rail networks, and promises of reduced fares.In a tweet, Fridays for Future criticised the plans:
Dear government: if you spend years doing nothing for climate protection and then, after months of massive public pressure, discuss measures that have nothing to do with [the plan to halt global warming at] 1.5C, then that’s not a ‘breakthrough’ but a scandal.
You can see some of the best pictures of the day here:
Global climate strike: millions protest worldwide – in pictures
Thanks for the excellent questions, which have ranged from science and politics to a plea from a deskbound worker – hang in there! – and thanks to you all for taking part in the debate over climate issues and solutions.
Today’s climate strikes have sent a message round the world that will be heard in the highest echelons of politics and business, but which have also helped to spur public engagement with the solutions to the crisis that will be needed if we are to make the vast changes we must to avoid the worst ravages of climate chaos.
On a personal note, today is almost exactly 15 years since I started writing full-time about the climate crisis, and related environmental issues, and although progress in that time has been grindingly slow in many ways, it has also been marked by sudden leaps forward. Improving public understanding and engagement is at the heart of making a better future.
The messages from today are clear. This is not somebody else’s problem: it is ours. This is not a problem for the future: it is now. This is not an inevitable catastrophe: we can still make things much better.
A noisy and good natured protest is being held in Bedford, with a few hundred protesters, including one dressed as a giant dinosaur, marching along the High Street at lunchtime shouting “what do we want, climate justice”, “no planet B” and “this is what democracy looks like”.
The protest is being led by children from local schools, clearly drawing their inspiration from climate activist Greta Thunberg. Earlier, Bedford’s MP, Mohammad Yasin, addressed the crowd, saying he was sorry that politicians had let people down and pledging his support. One young protester addressing the crowd said: “We may only be 14 or 15 years old but we’re a force to be reckoned with.”
Later, a die-in was held in Harpur Square in Bedford town centre.
Indy Willaert, Liza, Fran Demeyer and Jana Bameils, all aged 13, have taken half a day off school to attend the climate march in Brussels.
Not all their teachers are in favour. “Some of them are alright with it, but some of them would rather have us in class,” says Fran, who has already taken part in several school strikes. “That climate is more important ... You can always do [your work] after school,” adds Indy.
Liza wants politicians to help make green choices easier, including reducing plastic waste. “We can only buy plastic because everything is in plastic. We want them to help us”
They all agree with Jana that politicians are not doing enough.
The four schoolgirls arrived from their home city of Ghent to join the climate march in Brussels, which started from the city’s North Station and will finish around the headquarters of the European Union.
Along the route there was music, drum beating and chanting. Young people jumped up and down to the slogan: “Plus chaud, plus chaud, plus chaud que le climat” (Hotter, hotter, hotter than the climate).
Stijn, a 28-year-old engineer, was missing work to join the protest. His employers “were not very happy about it but they couldn’t really make a fuss about it either,” he said. “Like the other side of my sign says there are no jobs on a dead planet so it is important to be here today.”
His friend, Deniz Malat, 27, a recent plant biology graduate, feels people are being ignored by the government. “We want change and we are being ignored by the government - the politicians. We want to come together to show we are serious and they should consider what we are saying here.”
People are also out in force in Poland.
Warsaw, Poland. #FridaysForFuture #ClimateStrike https://t.co/SeuHiUVxmT
Ten-year-old Nellie Jacobs and her mother, Helen, had never protested before their hometown of Whaley Bridge made national headlines earlier this month.
Nellie and her Dad were choosing books in the library of their quiet Derbyshire town when Helen called them in a panic to say its dam had burst and the whole neighbourhood could go under.
Carrying a homemade placard saying “School strike for climate”, Nellie was allowed to take the day off school at Whaley Bridge primary to join the global strike in Manchester.
She said:
Everyone had to be evacuated and we raced for high ground. I was quite scared because we weren’t expecting it. We occasionally get police cars coming through Whaley for something that’s not in Whaley but we’ve not had crises in Whaley.
I’m worried it might happen again. We weren’t used to that much rain so it made me worry and it made me think all this rain, we don’t get it usually so I thought that it was climate change that caused the rain.
Her mother Helen Jacobs said she had never protested in her life but felt infuriated by the inaction of global leaders. She said:
It’s kind of getting the politicians to realise that they’ve made a mistake in saying that it’s really nothing when it’s a really big problem and we need to act on it now. I thought if I got out here and did something then it might happen.
It’s been building up a lot in my mind. The climate is under threat and it has been for a long time but the action doesn’t seem to have fit the imperative. We feel like we need to wake the government up, we need to wake world leaders up and make them realise that we need systematic massive change.
We’re here and ready for change to bring the temperature down. We feel like we need to shake them by the collar to make them realise. The scientists are there telling them and still President Trump is denying climate change exists! Other leaders need to grab him, shake him, and get him on board. The whole world needs to get on this.
In Aviemore, a town in the Cairngorms National Park, in the Scottish Highlands, strikes are taking place.
So proud to see my sons heading off for the #ClimateStrike today in #Aviemore. The placards are made and they are ready to go #FridayForFuture Time for us all to do more #Cairngorms #Climate #NationalPark pic.twitter.com/74J9YXzZvN
We were sent another photograph of activity there today from Iain Gibson.
Nick from Norwich asked:
How can I join in the strike in a non-unionised office where no one cares about climate change without getting the sack?
That is a tough one. Most companies will be affected by climate chaos in some way, however: extreme weather events are already costing billions a year and those costs are not coming down soon. Foresighted companies will audit the risks they face and act to deal with them. If you work for a publicly listed company, you could try buying some shares and turning up at the AGM to ask questions about how they are dealing with climate risk. If you don’t, more of your co-workers may be interested in the climate than you think: polls show a great majority of people in most countries are concerned about the climate crisis.
Dan from Tunbridge Wells asked:
How will we make our nuclear power plants safe if this civilisation collapses? How does the hydrological cycle fit in? Can regenerative agriculture help?
Regenerative agriculture can help, and sustainable agriculture can reduce emissions, aid carbon storage and feed the world more healthily, as recent reports by the Lancet and WRI, among others, have shown. As for hydrology, the effects of climate chaos are likely to be the wet areas of the world getting wetter and the dry areas getting drier, which is problematic. And as for nuclear power, some people - including the Guardian’s George Monbiot - see it as an uncomfortable but perhaps necessary way out of the climate crisis, but the very long-term storage of nuclear waste is a problem still to be solved.
Kee from London asked:
How much impact do long-haul flights have? How does the impact compare with, say, driving a car, or using electrical household appliances every day?
My colleague Niko Kommenda recently published an excellent calculator showing what impact flights have. Whether you can offset the emissions from such flights by cutting carbon in other aspects depends on how many flights you take and where to.
Niko from Germany asked:
What is your estimate on how much renewables capacity Europe needs to build to meet its climate targets? My rough guess is between 30-40 GW per year, that would equal about 600 wind turbines per month, that’s quite a challenge (other forms of renewables are of course available).
The International Energy Agency and the European Environment Agency are the best sources.
Stephen from Cheshire asked:
Whatever happened to the plant a tree in ‘73 campaigns I grew up with in the 1970s? Surely now is a good time to kickstart this again with planting in every public space and private garden. Fruit trees also feed us and wildlife. I have planted hundreds of trees over the years. Ultimately, however, the planet is simply overcrowded. My wife and I chose to be child free so we’ve done our bit...
I love the plant a tree in 73 campaign as I used to have some of the stickers! Planting trees is part of the UK government response but so far targets have been missed. Today my colleague Rowena Mason reports on an NHS tree planting campaign.
Thousands of French youngsters skipped school to march through Paris. Claude Guyon, a cinema decorator and sculptor, was dressed as a Brazilian tribal leader and carried a “sacred rattle”. He said:
I’m here to represent the guardians of the Earth from north and South America. The tribal leader, who is a woman, gave me this headdress so I could be here today as an ambassador for her.