This article is from the source 'guardian' and was first published or seen on . The next check for changes will be

You can find the current article at its original source at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/live/2019/sep/20/climate-strike-global-change-protest-sydney-melbourne-london-new-york-nyc-school-student-protest-greta-thunberg-rally-live-news-latest-updates

The article has changed 36 times. There is an RSS feed of changes available.

Version 7 Version 8
Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates Global climate strike: Greta Thunberg and school students lead climate crisis protest – live updates
(42 minutes later)
Are you taking part in a climate strike or marking the day in any way? If so, we’d like to hear from you. Tell us what you’re doing and where and share any photos and videos via our reader call out here. If you prefer you can also share via WhatsApp by adding the contact +44(0)7867825056. Only the Guardian will see your responses and we will include some of your stories in our ongoing coverage.
Activists on bicycles block traffic at Ernst-Reuter-Platz square in Berlin, Germany, as they take part in the global climate strike today.
There will be a “special takeover” of Channel 4’s usual evening weather report today, as the network joins the world’s largest climate strike. The channel’s social media accounts will also join the walkout, bosses said, and will be going on strike between 9.30am and 5.30pm.
Additionally, continuity announcers will share facts drawn from World Meteorological Organisation research throughout the day on Channel 4. No details were given on the nature of the weather forecast’s “special takeover”. Across Britain, thousands will take part in a march. Worldwide, campaigners say there are more than 3,400 events planned in 120 countries, with numbers taking part expected to surpass the estimated 1.6 million people who took part in the global strike in March.
The outdoor apparel brand Patagonia is closing every store worldwide to encourage employees and customers to join the climate strike.
Demonstrators from more than 150 countries are expected to put pressure on governments and decision-makers to do more about climate issues.
The strikes come ahead of the United Nations climate change summit, which begins on 23 September.
While in the UK and many other countries the strike is taking place today, in some countries such as Italy and the Netherlands the strike is happening next Friday, 27 September.
Explaining the decision to close stores, Ryan Gellert, the general manager, EMEA, Patagonia, said: “The climate crisis is a human issue – affecting all of us ... As a global business, we will be closing our stores on 20 and 27 September, striking with the youth activists and calling for governments around the world to take action.”
The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, will today thank young people for educating the world about the climate crisis.
Speaking at the youth climate strike Corbyn will also criticise prime minister Boris Johnson for calling global warming a “primitive fear”.
He is expected to say:
To the young people leading by example today here and across the world, I want to say thank you: thank you for educating us about the climate crisis and the emergency of species extinction and biodiversity loss.
I know the situation can look bleak. We have a prime minister that has called global warming a ‘primitive fear without foundation’. The US President is a full-blown climate denier, putting our planet in danger by pulling out of the Paris climate agreement. And the Amazon is on fire, looted by big corporations with a Brazilian president watching on who doesn’t care.
But when we see young people demanding urgent action, it’s an inspiration. When I see this movement growing – and it’s growing every day – I know we can tackle the climate emergency.
The next Labour government will welcome your pressure and hear your demands for change. We will kick start a Green Industrial Revolution and protect our planet, so it’s there to give life and joy to generations to come.”
I will be picking up the live blog from the Guardian’s London offices. Please share any photographs or comments from where you are with me: sarah.marsh@theguardian.com
I’ll be handing over the blog now to my colleague Sarah Marsh. There are still hundreds of places, thousands of students and hours of protest to come.I’ll be handing over the blog now to my colleague Sarah Marsh. There are still hundreds of places, thousands of students and hours of protest to come.
Stay with us as the strikes sweep across Europe and into the Americas. There will also be plenty more Australian news and analysis to come. Stay with us as the strikes sweep across Asia, Africa and Europe, and into the Americas. There will also be plenty more Australian news and analysis to come.
To recap what we’ve seen across Asia and the Pacific today:To recap what we’ve seen across Asia and the Pacific today:
At least 300,000 people have taken part in the largest climate strike across Australia yet.At least 300,000 people have taken part in the largest climate strike across Australia yet.
Melbourne’s event drew 100-150000 people, and Sydney’s 80-100,000. Hobart’s 22,000 attendees made it the state’s biggest ever strike action. Melbourne’s event drew 100-150,000 people, and Sydney’s 80-100,000. Hobart’s 22,000 attendees made it Tasmania’s biggest ever strike action.
Hundreds of regional centres joined in – from Alice Springs, Byron Bay and Katherine.Hundreds of regional centres joined in – from Alice Springs, Byron Bay and Katherine.
As part of Guardian Australia’s coverage, the federal energy minister, the opposition energy spokesman and two of the country’s biggest energy companies took questions from students.As part of Guardian Australia’s coverage, the federal energy minister, the opposition energy spokesman and two of the country’s biggest energy companies took questions from students.
In Vanuatu, the deputy prime minister spoke directly to the US, Canada, Australia, Japan and New Zealand as countries “to blame for this threat to our survival”.In Vanuatu, the deputy prime minister spoke directly to the US, Canada, Australia, Japan and New Zealand as countries “to blame for this threat to our survival”.
Protests also unfolded in the Solomon Islands, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, India, Pakistan and more.Protests also unfolded in the Solomon Islands, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, India, Pakistan and more.
As our Australian coverage wraps up, here’s a great round-table discussion from some Brisbane students about today. 22000 people in Hobart, Tasmania... And this is Sydney still gathering!!!#ClimateStrike #FridaysForFuture https://t.co/wt5YPuGRL7
As our Australian coverage wraps up, here’s a great round-table discussion from some Brisbane students.
"That was insane!": Post-#climatestrike debrief with Lestyn Harries (13), Owynn Harries (11), Haemish Lander-McBride (13), Oscar Lander-McBride (10) Zachary Brown (13) and Jackson Warren (13). pic.twitter.com/X3eH4lv0bu"That was insane!": Post-#climatestrike debrief with Lestyn Harries (13), Owynn Harries (11), Haemish Lander-McBride (13), Oscar Lander-McBride (10) Zachary Brown (13) and Jackson Warren (13). pic.twitter.com/X3eH4lv0bu
This from the headmaster of Sydney's Newington College, on why he allowed his students to attend #ClimateStrike #FridaysForFuture pic.twitter.com/R2JiXuTvsrThis from the headmaster of Sydney's Newington College, on why he allowed his students to attend #ClimateStrike #FridaysForFuture pic.twitter.com/R2JiXuTvsr
We have 3 demands:1. No new coal, oil and gas projects, including the Adani mine.2. 100% renewable energy generation, and exports by 20303. Fund a just transition and job creation for all fossil-fuel workers and communities#ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/4DUCqbjudtWe have 3 demands:1. No new coal, oil and gas projects, including the Adani mine.2. 100% renewable energy generation, and exports by 20303. Fund a just transition and job creation for all fossil-fuel workers and communities#ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/4DUCqbjudt
They’ve finally started marching in Melbourne. And here’s our video wrap of the thousands on the streets today.They’ve finally started marching in Melbourne. And here’s our video wrap of the thousands on the streets today.
More from Lisa Cox in MelbourneMore from Lisa Cox in Melbourne
Edie Shepherd, a Wiradjuri and Noongar woman, spoke to the crowd earlier. She said she’d recently visited communities in the Lake Woods region in the NT, an area that gas companies are proposing to frack.Edie Shepherd, a Wiradjuri and Noongar woman, spoke to the crowd earlier. She said she’d recently visited communities in the Lake Woods region in the NT, an area that gas companies are proposing to frack.
“While Lake Woods usually flows with water, this time it ran dry,” she said. As well as students, unions are here today. Sam Davis is a member of the National Union of Workers and was here with his young family. “We want to show that climate justice is very important to workers as well. A lot of our workers are going to be impacted by climate change in the near future too,” he says. “The values we have as unionists are why I’ve brought my kids.”“While Lake Woods usually flows with water, this time it ran dry,” she said. As well as students, unions are here today. Sam Davis is a member of the National Union of Workers and was here with his young family. “We want to show that climate justice is very important to workers as well. A lot of our workers are going to be impacted by climate change in the near future too,” he says. “The values we have as unionists are why I’ve brought my kids.”
They’ve started in Mumbai:
#GlobalClimateStrike has started.. children demanding for #ClimateEmergency .. 'we want more trees!' #ActNow for their future! Join us take #ClimateAction @GretaThunberg @MumbaiMirror @350 @FFFIndia pic.twitter.com/3lmzPUNoFA
In Pakistan:
The first of 3 climate protests planned for #Mardan has started! #ClimateMarchPakistan pic.twitter.com/sldhirCAbA
While in Melbourne, the crowd is so big it’s going to take a few more hours:
The #Melbourne Naarm crowd so massive at #ClimateStrike we march back to the start and half the crowd hasn't even left! pic.twitter.com/yiZLNDgOY9
If you’re waking up in Europe and the UK, then here is where you can find a protest near you:
Global climate strike: how you can get involved
And here’s First Dog’s last cartoon for today:
The organisers of the School Strike For Climate have estimated more than 300,000 people took to the streets across Australia today.
More than double the number of Australians who rallied at climate strikes in March came out today, with an estimated 100,000 in Melbourne, 80,000 in Sydney, 30,000 in Brisbane, 20,000 in Hobart, 15,000 in Canberra, 10,000 in Perth and 10,000 in Adelaide, not to mention the other more than 100 events in non-capital cities and towns.
Organisations striking included 33 Australian unions, 2,500 businesses including Atlassian, Canva, Domain and Intrepid, and faith institutions including the Anglican Church & Uniting Church, they said.
There are well over 100,000 people here in Melbourne and organisers are talking about 150,000.
Niamh, 17, from Castlemaine told the crowd: “I fight for climate justice because everyone deserves a safe future. The government is not supporting it yet, but together we will change that.”
Freya, 16, from Melbourne said: “The climate crisis is a human and global issue, and we need to act now.”
The students spoke about recent natural disasters around the world, including massive wildfires in the Amazon and the early bushfires that have caused devastation in Queensland and NSW. “This is predicted to get a lot worse if we don’t act now,” Niamh said.
The students then spoke about the demands of young people striking today, which include the complete phase-out of fossil fuels. The students have gone to great lengths to talk about the need to secure the futures of workers in fossil fuel-intensive industries, whose livelihoods will be affected as economies become carbon-neutral.
Freya said: “We understand the role fossil fuels have played in putting food on the table for families. It’s vital we all work together, not against one another. It’s not about jobs v the environment.”
Everyone looks so nice in the sunshine #climatestrike pic.twitter.com/zr7XNjggKr
Melbourne's poster game is strong #ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/YcNw5HkejQ
Tens if not hundreds of thousands packed out Sydney’s Domain park in the CBD.
Moemoana, 18, has come from Wollongong to the protest, and her homeland is Samoa. She’s here with members of the Matavai Pacific cultural centre.
“I’ve come to fight for the Pacific. The Pacific Islands are [only] metres above sea level because of climate change and it’s a scary future for our islands. We want to urge people to take some action.
“Seas are rising [in] Pacific Islands, especially Tuvalu and Kiribati, it’s a real threat, and Australia needs to know that Pacifika are neighbours and Australia really needs to help out.
18-year-old Moemoana, (centre) has come from Wollongong to the protest, and her homeland is Samoa. “It’s a real threat and Australia needs to know that Pacifika are neighbours and Australia really needs to help out."#climatestrike pic.twitter.com/67bvwsdnuU
17-year-old protest organiser Daisy spoke of the third demand of the campaign: funding a just transition and job creation for all fossil-fuel workers and communities.
“We need solutions that care for people and our planet,” she said.
“Climate justice is not about jobs versus the environment. Just as climate change hurts people, unemployment hurts people.”
She said too many people were already suffering and would suffer if governments did not find solutions.
“If our government cares about all of us then they need to get on with the job of stopping any new coal, oil and gas projects, powering Australia with 100% renewable energy by no later than 2030, and doing all this while funding just transition and jobs for all fossil fuel workers and their communities so that no one is left behind.”
Marlie Thomas, a Kamilaroi teenager from Gunnedah, said she was attending the rally on the authority of her elders, not the Department of Education.
“I’ve had to help collect bottled water for our family in Walgett,” she said.
Former federal MP and City of Sydney councillor Kerryn Phelps told Guardian Australia cities “need to play their part when it comes planning for the future and mitigating climate change”.
“That includes our own operations, working with businesses and residents, providing incentives to people to reduce their carbon footprint, to encourage active public transport, to encourage renewable sources of energy.
“And because of the sheer size of the population, not only do they contribute so much to climate change risk but they also have the most, I think, to offer. Obviously we’ve got the agriculture sector, which needs to play its part, the transport sector, but individuals also can do so much themselves.”
With the Australian strikes not even half over in many places, here’s what has happened so far:
Hundreds of thousands have participated in the largest climate strike across Australia yet: more than 100 locations, from capital cities to regional centres such as Alice Springs, Byron Bay and Katherine.
In Sydney and Melbourne crowds were estimated at 80,000 to 150,000 respectively, making them the biggest demonstrations since the Iraq war. In Tasmania 22,000 marchers made it the biggest strike action the state had ever seen.
As part of Guardian Australia’s coverage, the federal energy minister, the opposition energy spokesman and two of the country’s biggest energy companies took questions from students.
In Vanuatu, the deputy prime minister spoke directly to the US, Canada, Australia, Japan and New Zealand as countries “to blame for this threat to our survival”.
Protests in the Solomon Islands, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong and many more also continued throughout the day.
They’re marching in the Philippines, too.
HAPPENING NOW: March to J. Diokno Park, CHR, UP Diliman Complex pic.twitter.com/dqr1imYJcY
We have reached the Commission on Human Rights! Join us here. #ClimateStrike #ClimateStrikePH #ParaSaKlimabukasan pic.twitter.com/EkygPYxBd2
Amazing #CoffsHarbour #ClimateStrike over 1400 people TRIPLE the March 15 #Schoolstrike4climate huge energy marching on Gumbaynggirr land for our kids future #ClimateJustice pic.twitter.com/Ffj17LgrGB